Modern Movements and Styles - Full List Movements and Styles in Interwar Modern Art

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Movements and Styles in Interwar Modern Art

This section provides information about important movements, styles, tendencies, groups, and schools of Modern and Contemporary Art.

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Interwar Modern Art: 20 of 96 Total Movements
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Started: 1900

Ended: 1945

Art Deco was an eclectic style that flourished in the 1920s and '30s and influenced art, architecture and design. It blended a love of modernity - expressed through geometric shapes and streamlined forms - with references to the classical past and to exotic locations.

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Started: 1919

Ended: 1933

Bauhaus is a style and movement associated with the Bauhaus school, an extremely influential art and design school in Weimar Germany that emphasized the functionality and efficiency of design alongside its material properties. Prominent teachers include Josef Albers, Walter Gropius, Wassily Kandinsky, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, and Paul Klee.

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Started: 1909

Ended: 1940

The artists of the Bloomsbury Group were innovative British painters, designers, and art critics Bell, Grant, Wood+ breathed fresh life into the stuffy 1900's art scene.

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Started: 1915

Ended: Late 1930s

Contructivism was a movement that emerged in Revolutionary Russia among such artists as Vladimir Tatlin, Aleksander Rodchenko, Antoine Pevsner, and Naum Gabo. Celebrating 'art as machine,' it emphasized space, construction, and industrial materials.

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Started: 1916

Ended: 1924

Dada emerged in the early twentieth century as a literary and artistic movement that celebrated random chance, readymade artworks, and outragous performances. Its practitioners, including Hugo Ball, Tristan Tzara, and Marcel Duchamp, scorned bourgeois conventions of high culture, especially the appreciation for artistic intention and skill.

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Started: 1919

Ended: 1960s

This ground-breaking practice of photography was inspired by Dada's improvisational practices and the Surrealist's foray into the unconscious, dream, and fantasy realms. Many artists contributed various works that ultimately stretched the possibilities of the medium.

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Started: 1917

Ended: 1931

De Stijl was an avant-garde group dedicated to isolating a single visual style that would be appropriate to all aspects of modern life, from art to design to architecture.

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Started: 1914

Ended: 1970

The International Style was a style of modern architecture that emerged in the 1920s and '30s. It emphasized balance, the importance of function, and clean lines devoid of ornamentation. Glass and steel buildings, with less emphasis on conrete, is the most common and pure realization of structures in this style.

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Started: 1920

Ended: 1950

Mexican Muralism was a vibrant movement whose artists created large-scale works, executed in Mexico and the US. Relying on a mixture of Mexican heritage and classical Italian styles, murals were frequently done in a figurative, allegorical style and dealt with political, social, and radical themes.

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Started: 1917

Ended: 1944

Neo-Plasticism was the guiding philosophy behind the art of Dutch painter Piet Mondrian and many of his peers in the De Stijl circle. Articulated by Mondrian in 1917-18, the approach stipulates the strict use of only horizontal and vertical lines and the primary colors red, yellow, and blue.

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Started: 1919

Ended: 1933

New Objectivity, or Neue Sachlichkeit, was a style of German art that emerged in the 1920s in reaction to post World War I trauma and difficulties. Artists such as Otto Dix were savagely satirical and critical of society, while others evolved a cool and classical style that echoes other European art movements at this time.

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Started: 1882

Nihonga artists preserved the heritage of classical Japanese painting while reinvigorating it for modern, global exposure and artistic influence.

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Started: 1911

Ended: 1914

Orphism was a French art movement that brought together contemporary theories of philosophy and color there were pioneered mainly by Robert and Sonia Delaunays.

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Started: 1911

Ended: 1916

After the Russian Revolution, collaborative groups of futurists formed in St. Petersburg and in Moscow, publishing journals, organizing debates, and curating exhibitions of their work. Artists such as Natalya Goncharova, Kasimir Malevich, and Vladimir Mayakovsky reject past approaches and looked to Russian icongraphy, French Cubism, and the avant-garde of Europe for new directions for art-making.

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Started: 1910

Ended: 1918

The Salon Cubists built upon the early Cubist experiments of Pablo Picasso and George Braque and painted large scale, vibrant paintings.

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Started: 1929

Ended: Late 1950s

Social Realism refers to a style of figurative art with social concerns - generally left-wing. Inspired in part by nineteenth-century Realism, it emerged in various forms in the twentieth century. Political radicalism prompted its emergence in 1930s America, while distaste for abstract art encouraged many in Europe to maintain the style into the 1950s.

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Started: 1910

Straight Photography is a movement centered on depicting a scene in sharp focus and detail as a way to emphasize the photographic medium and distinguish it from painting. Straight Photographers manipulated darkroom techniques to enhance the photograph with higher contrast and rich tonality.

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Started: 1924

Ended: 1966

Perhaps the most influential avant-garde movement of the century, Surrealism was founded in Paris in 1924 by a small group of writers and artists who sought to channel the unconscious as a means to unlock the power of the imagination. Much influenced by Freud, they believed that the conscious mind repressed the power of the imagination. Influenced also by Marx, they hoped that the psyche had the power to reveal the contradictions in the everyday world and spur on revolution.

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Started: 1928

Ended: 1950

Surrealist films, an important part of the greater Surrealism movement, explore, reveal, and possibly even replicate the inner-workings of the subconscious mind in a highly visual and accessible manner.

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Started: 1924

Ended: 1966

The objects and sculptures of Surrealism pierced the veil between reality and our more primitive desires, fantasies, taboos. A number of the Surrealists specialized in making three dimensional objects that conjured images and ideas from the primal, subconscious spaces of their psyches.

Interwar Modern Art: 20 of 96 Total Movements

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