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Marianne von Werefkin Photo

Marianne von Werefkin

Russian-German-Swiss Expressionist Painter

Movements and Styles: Expressionism, Der Blaue Reiter

Born: September 10, 1860 - Tula, Russia

Died: February 6, 1938 - Ascona, Switzerland

Marianne von Werefkin Timeline

Important Art by Marianne von Werefkin

The below artworks are the most important by Marianne von Werefkin - that both overview the major creative periods, and highlight the greatest achievements by the artist.

Self-Portrait in a Sailor's Blouse (1893)

Self-Portrait in a Sailor's Blouse (1893)

Artwork description & Analysis: This self-portrait, painted at the age of 33, is an example of Werefkin's early, Russian Realist-influenced work. She portrays herself in a sailor's blouse, holding her long brushes and engaging the viewer with easy assurance. Werefkin is probably at her family's Blagodat Estate, in modern-day Lithuania, where her studio was located until her emigration to Germany with Alexej von Jawlensky in 1896.

After a series of successful exhibitions, in 1893 Werefkin seemed to be at the start of a prestigious artistic career in her native Russia. Her body of work from this time mainly consists of portraiture, influenced by her tutor Ilya Repin's work in this genre, and by the emphasis which Repin and other Realist painters placed on depicting contemporary Russian life. But whereas Werefkin's earliest paintings, such as Portrait of A Girl in Russian Costume (1883-88) and Portrait of Vera Repin (1881), match the photographic precision of her teacher's work - see Repin's famous Barge Haulers on The Volga (1870-73), for example - this slightly later piece uses a more painterly, expressive style, perhaps reflecting Repin's engagement with French Impressionism during the 1870s. Werefkin was dubbed the 'Russian Rembrandt' for her mastery of oil, and for her capacity to capture both the outer appearance and inner essence of her subject.

Early works such as Self-Portrait in a Sailor's Blouse show the depth of the artistic heritage from which Werefkin's mature, Expressionist persona emerged. Like the great Russian Realist novelists of the nineteenth century - Leo Tolstoy, Fyodor Dostoevsky - Ilya Repin and his Realist comrades saw their work as serving not only a sociological function but also a deep spiritual purpose, a sense of purpose which Werefkin seems to have imbibed, and which emerges again in her statements on the spiritual value of abstract and Expressionist aesthetics.

Oil on canvas painting - Museum of Modern Art, Ascona, Switzerland

Portrait of Helene (c. 1909)

Portrait of Helene (c. 1909)

Artwork description & Analysis: This small painting, showing a half-naked woman in high heels, knee-length stockings and hat, is one of the earliest works created by Werefkin after her return to painting in 1906. Depicting an unknown sitter, the impressionistic quality of the piece reflects Werefkin 's search for a new expressive vocabulary, after the abandonment of her early, Realist style, and following her extensive interactions with painters on the Munich art scene, such as Wassily Kandinsky, Gabrielle Münter, and Franz Marc.

During her hiatus from painting, Werefkin had immersed herself in art history, and had filled countless notebooks with writings and drawings, creating over 400 sketches in a fluid, expressive style. When she began painting again she adapted this style to the canvas, becoming increasingly concerned with capturing the inner life of her subjects in a way that might rupture, or exaggerate, aspects of their outer appearance, combining the visible and invisible qualities of her sitters. At the same time, the sexual frisson of the subject-matter seems to owe something to the depiction of seamy Parisian night-life by Post-Impressionist painters such as Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. A few years before creating the piece, during 1903-05, Werefkin had travelled to France with Jawlensky, taking in the stylistic advances of artists attached to the Nabi, synthetist and cloisonnist movements, who were attempting to use color and form to convey the emotional and spiritual content of their subjects.

Portrait of Helene can be seen as an important transitional work. It indicates Werefkin's departure from the Realist and Post-Impressionist styles of her early work, while not yet conveying the full scope of her Expressionist idiom.

Gouache, pen and Indian ink on wove paper - Private collection

Return Home (c. 1909)

Return Home (c. 1909)

Artwork description & Analysis: This painting shows a group of women walking down a street at night in an urban setting, carrying parcels and babies, in a slow-paced, heavily-loaded procession. Buildings line the road, while the dull glow of the lamplight creates a melancholy mood. The work depicts the city of Kovno in Russia - modern-day Lithuania - where Werefkin was staying with her brother in 1909 while recovering from a leg injury.

Werefkin found the city of Kovno visually captivating, writing in her journal of the gloomy violets and dimness of the light, calling it "a treasure-trove for artists". But it was also the suffering of the city's inhabitants that preoccupied her, as she emphasized in her diary: "All that is here is suffering and this horror of beauty and this horrible life". To better express the inner life of her subjects, she turned to techniques reminiscent of French Cloissonism or Synthetism, the use of heavily outlined, flat blocks of color, from which light seems to emanate as through panels of stained glass. The somber mood of the piece is typical of much European art at this time, owing much to the Post-Impressionist style of Vincent van Gogh, who had depicted peasant women at work - in the fields, by the hearth - in similarly melancholic fashion.

The marriage of a Post-Impressionist, expressive use of color with a somber, anxious mood is in a sense the basis of Expressionism, which was emerging simultaneously across various Northern-European cities around this time. This is also one of the first pieces in which we find the figure of the stooped or hunched woman in black, a recurring motif in Werefkin's work. In various respects, then, Return Home can be considered an important early painting of her mature period.

Tempera on paper - Museum of Modern Art, Ascona, Switzerland

Self-Portrait (c. 1910)

Self-Portrait (c. 1910)

Artwork description & Analysis: This remarkable self-portrait was created during Werefkin's time as a member of the Neue Künstvereinigung Munchen (NKVM), a group which she cofounded with Wassily Kandinsky and others in 1909 to forward ideas associated with Expressionism. The piece epitomizes many aspects of that group's approach to art, particularly in its stylised use of color, and its impression of psychological and spiritual intensity.

Werefkin uses an array of bold colors and tones to convey her own inner life: intense blues and greens for the background; vivid browns, reds, and yellows for her skin, hat, and clothes. The piece uses broad, loose brushwork, with the abstract patterning built up by the repetition of strokes across certain areas of the canvas assuming primary visual significance. In this respect, the painting shows the influence of Vincent van Gogh, whose innovative approach to brushwork Werefkin admired, while the dynamic, emotive use of color speaks to both Gauguin's work and that of the Norwegian Expressionist painter Edvard Munch.

Writing of Werefkin's membership of the NKVM, Adrienne Kochman states that she "often led discussions focused on the pursuit of an 'emotional' art of the future, recalling the work of Delacroix, Van Gogh, and Gauguin". Few paintings epitomize Werefkin's use of color to convey emotional content better than this Self-Portrait, which is now one of her best-known works, and considered a key example of Munich-school Expressionism. The piece is also described (by an unknown original source) as "one of the most unusual female self-portraits in the history of art", and it is difficult to argue, given the enigmatic, assertive expression of the face.

Tempera on paper - Städtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus, Munich

City in Lithuania (1913)

City in Lithuania (1913)

Artwork description & Analysis: This painting shows an old woman walking down a wide boulevard leaning on a crutch, approaching a distant town. She is surrounded by fields, and flanked by trees that seem to sway and bow in the wind. To the right, two ladies shelter in a large red doorway. City in Lithuania was painted in 1913, when Werefkin had again traveled home from Germany to what was then a district of Russia, to recuperate from an injury while staying with her brother. By this time, Werefkin had joined Der Blaue Reiter ('The Blue Rider'), a group which emerged in 1909 from the disintegration of the NKVM, founded by Wassily Kandinsky and Franz Marc. Paul Klee also became a member of the group, which, along with Die Brücke in Dresden, is now considered one of the crucibles of German Expressionism.

Der Blaue Reiter, which shares its name with a 1903 painting by Kandinsky, was founded on the belief that colors and shapes could convey certain innate spiritual values, and that art could transport the viewer beyond the physical, tangible world by engaging them with these forms. This painting sums many of those ideas, bearing obvious similarities to the work of other Blaue Reiter artists from the same period. The color palette, particularly the use of deep blues, is reminiscent of Paul Klee's contemporaneous work, while the convergence of diagonal lines towards the top-right of the painting can be comapred to Franz Marc's visually dynamic compositions, and his desire to find the underlying, organic rhythms of objects and living things. At the same time, the painting shows the clear influence of French Post-Impressionism. The almost liquid quality of the road-surface, for example, and the way the trees seem to dance in the wind, is very reminiscent of Van Gogh's brushwork, and his depiction of rural, roadside scenes.

If the piece indicates Werefkin's Expressionist affinities, it also speaks to her ongoing concern - perhaps owing something to her former tutor Ilya Repin - with depicting the grime and toil of everyday life, particularly the life of the downtrodden female laborer. Again, we find the motif of the hunched woman in black, while the subtly pervasive mood of loneliness, though indicative of the broader concerns of Expressionism, is unique to Werefkin's work. In this sense, City in Lithuania, like Werefkin's paintings of the Blue Rider period more generally, can be considered both exemplary and exceptional.

Tempera on paper over cardboard - Museum of Modern Art, Ascona, Switzerland

Storm Winds (Sturmwind) (1915-17)

Storm Winds (Sturmwind) (1915-17)

Artwork description & Analysis: Storm Winds (Sturmwind) depicts a small café at night, surrounded by bare trees and stormy skies. Figures approach the lit doorway, hugging their shoulders inwards against the cold, while the window throws a pool of multicolored light onto the ground. This work is a product of Werefkin's post-Munich period, created at some point between 1915 and 1917 as she travelled around Switzerland with her fellow artist Alexej von Jawlenksy, the pair having fled Germany at the outbreak of the First World War.

Werefkin once stated "color bites at my heart", and this work indicates her ongoing fascination with color, combining various intense, vibrant hues within small areas of the canvas. It also shows her sustained interest in the work of Vincent van Gogh, and is perhaps partly a homage to his famous 1888 painting The Night Café. By this point, the extent of Werefkin's differences from other members of the German Expressionist movement is also clear. Whereas artists like Klee and Kandinsky had moved towards a purer form of abstraction, Werefkin's work remained wedded to figurative representation, and thus to the direct exploration of human life and society. In this sense, Storm Winds indicates her movement through and beyond the NKVM and Blaue Reiter groups, towards the unique form of landscape and city-scape painting that she would hone in her later years in Ascona.

Oil on canvas - Albertina Museum, Vienna, Austria

The Rag-and-Bone Man (1917)

The Rag-and-Bone Man (1917)

Artwork description & Analysis: Painted in 1917, this work shows a rag-and-bone man, a kind of urban scavenger, leaning on a stick as he passes in front of an Alpine landscape. He is surrounded by a dark lake, on which a small rowing boat drifts; in the background, mountains rise up to the moon as vast, hooded figures, while the sky explodes in yellow and black. It was around 1917 that Werefkin relocated to the small lake-side town of Ascona in Switzerland, and this may be an early work composed in that setting.

The depiction of large, simplified, organic shapes, and the use of intense color contrasts, reveals Werefkin's ongoing interest in the use of non-naturalistic color and shape to express the spiritual depths of people and things. The skeletal appearance of the rag-and-bone man - a surrogate for the stooped women who appears across many of her works - epitomizes Werefkin's concern with the isolation and hardship of the poor city-dweller, while also suggesting the emaciating effects of war. Art historian Laima Lauckaite has pointed out the affinities between paintings such as The Rag-and-Bone Man and those of the Lithuanian painter M.K. Čiurlionis. Both artists of Russian heritage, Werefkin and Čiurlionis share a connection to the Romantic and Symbolist traditions, along with a taste "for the motif of mountains, the embodiment of grandeur and eternity". A connection can also be established with works of Edward Munch's such as Despair (1892), which convey the loneliness of the human condition by setting a solitary figure against a dramatic landscape.

Despite the urban connotations of its title, The Rag-and-Bone Man is a good example of Werefkin's approach to landscape painting, a genre she explored throughout her life, especially after her relocation to mountainous Switzerland (as in late works such as The Duel (1933)). The way that the mountains appear almost as animated human bodies indicates Werefkin's belief in the world of the spirit that lay behind physical reality, what Lauckaite calls her fascination with "what does not exist in reality - the intangible, the invisible, the inaudible". In this case, the painting aims to reveal the supernatural force of the landscape.

Tempera on paper over cardboard - Museum of Modern Art, Ascona, Switzerland

The Monk (1932)

The Monk (1932)

Artwork description & Analysis: Painted four years before Werefkin's death, the religious subject-matter of The Monk is typical of her later work, in which the symbol of the crucifixion appears repeatedly. Behind this central image, the mood and color of the landscape seems to have lifted as compared to earlier Alpine scenes such as The Rag-and-Bone Man. Bright red and orange tones define the mountains on the left, counterbalanced by soft blue on the right, and dark burgundy in the far distance. The sky and ground are soft pink, the only dark tones of the work to be found in the robes of the monk, who seems to be observing not the suffering in front of him, but the wonders of the natural world around him.

Although Werefkin's mature work is defined by a movement through Symbolism - and associated styles such as Cloisonnism and Synthetism - to Expressionism, this painting shares many traits with the work of Symbolist painters such as Odilon Redon: the use of luminous color to portray 'another world', and the focus on religious themes and iconography. The presence of the mountains, which appear in many works from this period, indicates the influence of the Swiss landscape on Werefkin's late style.

Werefkin often took comfort in the Biblical saying "My kingdom is not of this world", and this painting encapsulates her lifelong quest to portray the other, spiritual world that she sensed all around her, finding traces of it both in nature and in the inner recesses of the self. Perhaps based on a new spiritual faith, that hidden world seems divested of the gloom of her earlier work, the color-palette of The Monk instead conveying a mood of bliss and hope.

Tempera on cardboard - Museum of Modern Art, Ascona, Switzerland



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Marianne von Werefkin Photo

Related Art and Artists

Gustave Courbet: A Burial at Ornans (1849-50)

A Burial at Ornans (1849-50)

Movement: Realism

Artist: Gustave Courbet

Artwork description & Analysis: With A Burial at Ornans, Courbet made his name synonymous with the young Realist movement. By depicting a simple rural funeral service in the town of his birth, Courbet accomplished several things. First, he made a painting of a mundane topic with unknown people (each attendee is given a personalized portrait) on a scale traditionally reserved for history painting. Second, he eschewed any spiritual value beyond the service; the painting, often compared to El Greco's Burial of Count Orgaz (1586), leaves out El Greco's depiction of Christ and the heavens. Third, Courbet's gritty depiction showed the fashionable Salon-goers of Paris their new political equals in the country, as the 1848 Revolution had established universal male suffrage. Artistically, Courbet legendarily stated, "A Burial at Ornans was in reality the burial of Romanticism," opening up a new visual style for an increasingly modern world.

Oil on canvas - Musée d'Orsay

Franz Marc: The Yellow Cow (1911)

The Yellow Cow (1911)

Movement: Der Blaue Reiter

Artist: Franz Marc

Artwork description & Analysis: Before and during his years in Der Blaue Reiter, Marc developed a color theory that ran parallel and occasionally overlapped with Kandinsky's. In a 1910 letter to August Macke, he wrote: "Blue is the male principle, astringent and spiritual. Yellow is the female principle, gentle, gay, and spiritual. Red is matter, brutal and heavy and always the color to be opposed and overcome by the other two." In Yellow Cow, then, Marc portrayed his emblem of femininity, resounding in its joyous spirituality, barely able to be suppressed or even balanced out by the opposing colors that surround it. Marc was predominantly a painter of animals, and pantheistic "back-to-nature" groups, popular in turn-of-the-century Germany, influenced his idea of spiritualism. Taking a stance closely related to Primitivism, Marc considered animals to be closer to an innate, natural state of spirituality that mankind lost with civilization.

Oil on canvas - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

Francesco Clemente: Scissors and Butterflies (1999)
Artwork Images

Scissors and Butterflies (1999)

Movement: Neo-Expressionism

Artist: Francesco Clemente

Artwork description & Analysis: Clemente, pictured here in his usual variety of self-portraits, was one of the few Italian painters who was a part of the international array of Neo-Expressionist artists. Employing a highly sensual style that he assimilated during his many stays in India, quasi-abstract forms combine with human and animal figures. Clemente mixed elements of erotica (influenced by his exposure to Indian culture) with red-hot anger (influenced by his exposure to the grittiness and violence he witnessed while in New York). As was typical of his work, a metamorphosis takes place. In Scissors and Butterflies, these metamorphoses occur between humans and animals, the feminine and the masculine, and the violent and the sexual/spiritual. This inner conflict of existential expressiveness is often found in Neo-Expressionism, but Clemente makes this the central focus of his art as he engages all pictorial elements in the service of self as a way of experiencing the world.

Oil on linen - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

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Content compiled and written by Sarah Frances Dias

Edited and revised, with Synopsis and Key Ideas added by Greg Thomas

" Artist Overview and Analysis". [Internet]. . TheArtStory.org
Content compiled and written by Sarah Frances Dias
Edited and revised, with Synopsis and Key Ideas added by Greg Thomas
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