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Artists Jeff Koons
Jeff Koons Photo

Jeff Koons

American Painter, Illustrator, Sculptor

Movement: Neo Pop Art

Born: January 21, 1955 - York, Pennsylvania

Jeff Koons Timeline

Quotes

"I believe that art has been a vehicle for me that's been about enlightenment and expanding my own parameters, to give me courage to exercise the freedom that I have in life."
Jeff Koons
"Art has this ability to allow you to connect back through history in the same way that biology does. I'm always looking for source material."
Jeff Koons
"Art's a very metaphysical activity. It's something that enriches the parameters of your life, the possibilities of being, and you touch transcendence and you change your life. And you want to change the life of others, too. That's why people are involved with art."
Jeff Koons
"I've always enjoyed feeling a connection to the avant-garde, such as Dada and surrealism and pop art. The only thing the artist can do is be honest with themselves and make the art they want to make. That's what I've always done."
Jeff Koons
"I believe that my art gets across the point that I'm in this morality theater trying to help the underdog, and I'm speaking socially here, showing concern and making psychological and philosophical statements for the underdog."
Jeff Koons
"Art was something I could do better. It gave me a sense of self."
Jeff Koons
"I try to be a truthful artist and I try to show a level of courage. I enjoy that. I'm a messenger."
Jeff Koons
"If cheap cookie jars could become treasures in the 1980s, then how much more the work of the very egregious Jeff Koons, a former bond trader, whose ambitions took him right through kitsch and out the other side into a vulgarity so syrupy, gross, and numbing, that collectors felt challenged by it."
Art Historian Robert Hughes

"The job of the artist is to make a gesture and really show people what their potential is. It's not about the object, and it's not about the image; it's about the viewer. That's where the art happens."

Synopsis

Jeff Koons derives inspiration from things you might find at a yard sale: inflatable plastic toys, vacuum cleaners, porcelain trinkets and other items not typically considered fine art. He is the epitome of Neo-Pop, a 1980s movement that looked to earlier Pop artists, particularly Warhol, for inspiration. His steel Balloon Dog sculptures, probably his best-known works, transpose an ephemeral childhood memory into an enduring form. His work looks cheap, but is expensive, an ingenious reversal of economic logic that forms the basis for his stunning commercial success. Rather than offending the art snob, Koons has challenged top collectors to revise their notions of what fine art looks like. This is a brilliant marketing strategy. His work brings the highest prices of any living artist on the auction market. Evidence of a turning point in art history, Koons is a new kind of genius in art. A significant departure from the modernist ideal of the misunderstood visionary, Koons is the anti-modernist, a shrewd, self-proclaimed crowd-pleaser, and avid promoter of his own work.

Key Ideas

With greater showmanship, and on a grander scale, than any artist before him, Koons presents us with the clash between high art and popular culture.
Koons is essentially a late-20th-century incarnation of Marcel Duchamp. Like the French Conceptual artist who thought America's bridges and plumbing her finest artworks, Koons strips industrially-made objects of their practical purpose and re-presents them as art.
His sculptures are not merely conceptual, but aesthetic, in ways that challenge us, especially those of us accustomed to fine art. Kitsch and high culture, religion and eroticism, weightlessness and mass are among the apparent opposites that mix and mingle in his work.
Koons was among the first American artists to cast himself as a populist. In the rising economy of the 1980s, his message resonated with audiences sick of art world elitism. His outspoken distaste for abstract art, already fading from fashion, vaulted him into the limelight.
Somewhat paradoxically, his embrace of bad taste has won over the most discerning and ostensibly elitist audiences. By collecting Koons, collectors and museums show that they can take a joke.

Biography

Jeff Koons Photo

Early Life

Born in Pennsylvania on the first day of 1955, by the age of eight years old, he had begun creating replicas of Old Master paintings, which he signed 'Jeffrey Koons' and sold at his father's antique shop. After graduating from high school, he enrolled at the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, where he painted neo-surrealist dreamscapes heavily inspired by his hero Salvador Dali.

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Jeff Koons Biography Continues

Influences and Connections

Influences on Artist
Artists, Friends, Movements
Influenced by Artist
Artists, Friends, Movements
Jeff Koons
Interactive chart with Jeff Koons's main influences, and the people and ideas that the artist influenced in turn.
View Influences Chart

Artists

Marcel DuchampMarcel Duchamp
Salvador DalíSalvador Dalí

Personal Contacts

David SalleDavid Salle
Julian SchnabelJulian Schnabel

Movements

DadaDada
Pop ArtPop Art
SurrealismSurrealism
ImagismImagism

Influences on Artist
Jeff Koons
Jeff Koons
Years Worked: 1980 - present
Influenced by Artist

Artists

Mike KelleyMike Kelley
Damien HirstDamien Hirst

Personal Contacts

Peter HalleyPeter Halley
Ashley BickertonAshley Bickerton
Meyer VaismanMeyer Vaisman

Movements

Young British ArtistsYoung British Artists

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Content compiled and written by The Art Story Contributors

Edited and revised, with Synopsis and Key Ideas added by Ruth Epstein

" Artist Overview and Analysis". [Internet]. . TheArtStory.org
Content compiled and written by The Art Story Contributors
Edited and revised, with Synopsis and Key Ideas added by Ruth Epstein
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