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Russian Art Movements

These are the important Russian movements, styles, tendencies, groups, and schools that we currently cover. More are on the way!

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Russian: 9 of 103 Total Movements
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Started: 1961

Ended: 1980

Many Performance artists used their bodies as the subjects, and the objects of their art and thereby expressed their distinctive views in the newly liberated social, political, and sexual climate of the 1960s.>From different actions involving the body, to acts of physical endurance, tattoos, and even extreme forms of bodily mutilation are all included in the loose movement of Body art.

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Started: 1915

Ended: Late 1930s

Contructivism was a movement that emerged in Revolutionary Russia among such artists as Vladimir Tatlin, Aleksander Rodchenko, Antoine Pevsner, and Naum Gabo. Celebrating 'art as machine,' it emphasized space, construction, and industrial materials.

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Started: 1820s

Ended: 1880s

Naturalism is a movement within painting where the human subject is depicted in natural habitats and social milieus, with an emphasis on visual accuracy.

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Started: 1863

Ended: 1923

The Russian "Itinerants" or "Wanderers" were a group of painters specializing in archetypal Russian views such as pine forests, wheat fields, and water meadows.

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Started: 1911

Ended: 1914

Rayonism, sometimes refered to as rayism, was an abstract style of painting developed by Russian artists Mikhail Larionov and Natalia Goncharova. The term was derived from the use of dynamic rays of contrasting color that represented lines of reflected light.

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Started: c.1780

Ended: 1830

Romanticism was a nineteenth-century movement that celebrated the powers of emotion and intuition over rational analysis or classical ideals. Romantic artists emphasized awe, beauty, and the sublime in their works, which frequently charted the darker or chaotic sides of human life.

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Started: 1911

Ended: 1916

After the Russian Revolution, collaborative groups of futurists formed in St. Petersburg and in Moscow, publishing journals, organizing debates, and curating exhibitions of their work. Artists such as Natalya Goncharova, Kasimir Malevich, and Vladimir Mayakovsky reject past approaches and looked to Russian icongraphy, French Cubism, and the avant-garde of Europe for new directions for art-making.

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Started: 1929

Ended: Late 1950s

Social Realism refers to a style of figurative art with social concerns - generally left-wing. Inspired in part by nineteenth-century Realism, it emerged in various forms in the twentieth century. Political radicalism prompted its emergence in 1930s America, while distaste for abstract art encouraged many in Europe to maintain the style into the 1950s.

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Started: 1913

Ended: Late 1920s

Suprematism was founded by Russian artist Kazimir Malevich in 1915. Using geometric shapes--as simple as a black square on a white ground or as complex as myriad bars, trapezoids, and circles arranged in space--Suprematism sought to convey the fundamental and transcendent properties of art.

Russian: 9 of 103 Total Movements

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