Modern Movements and Styles - Full List Architecture Art Movements

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Architecture Art Movements

These are the important Architecture art movements, styles, tendencies, groups, and schools that we currently cover. More are on the way!

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Architecture: 14 of 103 Total Movements
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Started: 1890

Ended: 1905

Art Nouveau was a movement that swept through the decorative arts and architecture in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Artists drew inspiration from both organic and geometric forms, evolving elegant designs that united flowing, natural forms with more angular contours.

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Started: 1860

Ended: 1920

The Arts and Crafts Movement was an international design movement that originated in Great Britain and had a strong following in the United States. It advocated truth to materials and traditional craftsmanship using simple forms and often medieval, romantic or folk styles of decoration. It also proposed economic and social reform and has been seen as essentially anti-industrial.

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Started: 1919

Ended: 1933

Bauhaus is a style and movement associated with the Bauhaus school, an extremely influential art and design school in Weimar Germany that emphasized the functionality and efficiency of design alongside its material properties. Prominent teachers include Josef Albers, Walter Gropius, Wassily Kandinsky, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, and Paul Klee.

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Started: 1933

Ended: 1957

Black Mountain College was an experimental school founded in the middle of the twentieth century on the principles of balancing academics, arts, and manual labor within a democratic, communal society and influnced many important artists.

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Started: 1915

Ended: Late 1930s

Contructivism was a movement that emerged in Revolutionary Russia among such artists as Vladimir Tatlin, Aleksander Rodchenko, Antoine Pevsner, and Naum Gabo. Celebrating 'art as machine,' it emphasized space, construction, and industrial materials.

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Started: 1917

Ended: 1931

De Stijl was an avant-garde group dedicated to isolating a single visual style that would be appropriate to all aspects of modern life, from art to design to architecture.

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Started: 1401

Ended: 1490

Early in the 15th century, Florentine artists rejuvenated the arts with a more humanistic and individualistic treatment that spawned the Renaissance.

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Started: 1120

Ended: 1400

Gothic art flourished in Western Europe with monumental sculptures and stained-glass window decorated cathedrals - marked by the pointed Gothic arch.

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Started: 1490s

Ended: 1527

The High Renaissance, the epitome of Italian art before the modern era was the exemplified in the works of Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Raphael - among others.

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Started: 1914

Ended: 1970

The International Style was a style of modern architecture that emerged in the 1920s and '30s. It emphasized balance, the importance of function, and clean lines devoid of ornamentation. Glass and steel buildings, with less emphasis on conrete, is the most common and pure realization of structures in this style.

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Started: 1810

Ended: 1890

Orientalism is the term used by scholars to describe Westerners fascination with the Middle East, Asia, and North Africa in the nineteenth century. This fascination inspired a new wave of art (including painting and literature) that featured scenes from these societies, often dramatized and highly eroticized.

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Started: 963

Ended: 1120

Romanesque Art refers to medieval art of the eleventh and twelfth centuries, before the rise of the Gothic. Commonly depicting Christian scenes and symbols, Romanesque Art and Architecture shows the marks of Roman, Byzantine, and Northern European influence.

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Started: 1470

Ended: 1580

The Venetian School, or Venetian Renaissance, was a thriving cultural movement with a passion for lush color and a distinctly Venetian adoration of embellishment.

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Started: 1897

The Vienna Secession was a group of Austrian painters, sculptors and architects, who in 1897 resigned from the main Association of Austrian Artists with the mission of bringing modern European art to culturally-insulated Austria. Among the Secession's founding members were Gustav Klimt, Koloman Moser, Josef Hoffmann and Joseph Maria Olbrich.

Architecture: 14 of 103 Total Movements

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