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Artists Jacob Lawrence
Jacob Lawrence Photo

Jacob Lawrence

American Painter

Movements and Styles: Social Realism, Harlem Renaissance

Born: September 7, 1917 - Atlantic City, New Jersey

Died: June 9, 2000 - Seattle, Washington

Jacob Lawrence Timeline

Quotes

"My pictures express my life and experiences. I paint the things I know about and the things I have experienced. The things I have experienced extend into my national, racial and class group. So I paint about the American Negro working class."
Jacob Lawrence
"If at times my artworks do not express the conventionally beautiful, there is always an effort to express the universal beauty of man's continuous struggle to life his social position and to add dimension to his spiritual being."
Jacob Lawrence
"I have always liked a certain kind of structure that happens to be geometric. It's clean. To me, it has a cleanness about it, a neatness. Maybe that's it. A certain neatness. I keep my studio, try to keep my studio and home the same way...And in teaching I emphasize this aspect."
Jacob Lawrence
"My work is abstract in the sense of having been designed and composed but it is not abstract in the sense of having no human content."
Jacob Lawrence
"I am part of the Black community, so I am the Black community speaking."
Jacob Lawrence
"I like to think I've expanded my interest to include not just the Negro theme but man generally and maybe this speaks through the Negro I think this is valid also...I would like to think of it as dealing with all people, the struggle of man to always better his condition and to move forward..."
Jacob Lawrence
"I never use the term 'protest' in connection with my paintings. They just deal with the social scene...They're how I feel about things."
Jacob Lawrence
"I've always been invovled with content...and form, I think form is just as important [as content]."
Jacob Lawrence

"The community [in Harlem] let me develop...I painted the only way I knew how to paint...I tried to put the images down the way I related to the community...I was being taught...to see."

Jacob Lawrence Signature

Synopsis

Achieving success early in his career, Jacob Lawrence combined Social Realism, modern abstraction, pared down composition, and bold color to create compelling stories of African American experiences and the history of the United States. Drawing on his own life and what he witnessed in his Harlem neighborhood of New York City, Lawrence strove to communicate human struggles and aspirations that resonated with diverse viewers. Coming to artistic maturity during the waning of the Harlem Renaissance and the waxing of Abstract Expressionism, Lawrence charted a unique path, telling poignant stories of migration, war, and mental illness, among others, and would become a powerful influence for younger African American and African artists. While often drawing on the specific experiences of African Americans, Lawrence's long-running and prolific career produced an oeuvre that speaks dramatically, graphically, and movingly to viewers of all colors and persuasions.

Key Ideas

Early in his career, Lawrence's artistic process relied on a vast amount of historical research. Spending hours at the public library pouring over historical texts, memoirs, and newspapers and attending history clubs that were then popular in Harlem, Lawrence translated these histories into images and linked them to contemporary political struggles both in the North and the Jim Crow segregated South, reinvigorating traditional history painting.
Lawrence often worked in series, creating numerous individual panels, to tell a story. Influenced by avant-garde cinema, Lawrence's series often have a montage-effect, but he used structural strategies, such as a unified color palette and recurring motifs, to connect the individual paintings into a coherent whole.
Lawrence borrowed strategies from print media to make his stories based in experiential reality as compelling as possible . He paired long, descriptive captions with his paintings as was common in photo magazines and books in the 1930s and 1940s. Additionally, Lawrence used flat, unmodulated colors in large planes that had the quality of print graphics.
Lawrence's use of abstraction in depicting the characters of his stories allow those stories, even if historically specific, to have more universal appeal, as the viewer can imagine him or herself in similar positions. Lawrence's ability to imbue the particular drama of everyday life with the gravitas of collective, or universal, humanity is one of his greatest artistic feats.

Biography

Jacob Lawrence Photo

Childhood

Jacob Armstead Lawrence was born in Atlantic City, New Jersey, to Jacob and Rosa Lee Lawrence, who separated in 1924. Lawrence's parents originally hailed from South Carolina and Virginia, and his family made their way northward to New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and eventually Harlem, New York. The Lawrence family's relocation was emblematic of the World War I-era "Great Migration" of African-Americans out of the oppressive conditions of the Southern United States to the relative safety and economic opportunity promised in the Northern states.

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Jacob Lawrence Biography Continues

Influences and Connections

Influences on Artist
Artists, Friends, Movements
Influenced by Artist
Artists, Friends, Movements
Jacob Lawrence
Interactive chart with Jacob Lawrence's main influences, and the people and ideas that the artist influenced in turn.
View Influences Chart

Artists

Charles AlstonCharles Alston
Harry Gottlieb
Jose Clemente OrozcoJose Clemente Orozco
Josef AlbersJosef Albers
Käthe KollowitzKäthe Kollowitz

Personal Contacts

Alain Locke
Lincoln Kirstein
Jay Leyda
Claude McKay

Movements

Harlem RenaissanceHarlem Renaissance
Mexican MuralismMexican Muralism
Social RealismSocial Realism
CubismCubism
ExpressionismExpressionism

Influences on Artist
Jacob Lawrence
Jacob Lawrence
Years Worked: 1935 - 2000
Influenced by Artist

Artists

Romare BeardenRomare Bearden
Robert Colescott
Hank Willis Thomas
Kerry James Marshall
Alexis Gideon

Personal Contacts

Barbara Earl Thomas
Mary Randlett

Movements


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Cite this page

Content compiled and written by Elizabeth Berkowitz

Edited and published by The Art Story Contributors

" Artist Overview and Analysis". [Internet]. . TheArtStory.org
Content compiled and written by Elizabeth Berkowitz
Edited and published by The Art Story Contributors
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