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Artists Lynda Benglis
Lynda Benglis Photo

Lynda Benglis

American Sculptor, Painter, Conceptual and Performance Artist

Movements and Styles: Conceptual Art, Performance Art, Feminist Art

Born: October 25, 1941 - Lake Charles, Louisiana

Lynda Benglis Timeline

Quotes

"I just wanted to go beyond, and create something that was visually more. I was interested in excess, buoyancy, weight, gesture of material. It was very different from abstract expressionism."
Lynda Benglis
"I think mediums are all about form. They're mediums that I can make sketch as I think of myself as doing drawings and paintings in these different mediums. I think of them as forms from nature, about nature and having illusion. Some are dependent on the walls, some are dependent on the floor and some are outside pieces."
Lynda Benglis
"My work is an expression of space. What is the experience of moving? Is it pictorial? Is it an object? Is it a feeling? It all comes from my body. [...] I am the form."
Lynda Benglis
"The method of pouring latex directly onto the floor was, for Benglis, a pragmatic solution to what she considered to be an illogical attachment to a rectilinear ground. The constrictions of the conventional painting format prohibited the kinds of composition she sought to achieve with her material processes; by attending to the interactions of color on color, rather than color on canvas, she effectively dissolved the two-dimensional surface and its assertion as a physical ground."
Susan Richmond on Lynda Benglis' "fallen paintings"
"The images of Benglis producing her large-scale sculptures [...] aggressively stage the act of production."
Amelia Jones
"Whether you have been watching Ms. Benglis's varied career for decades or know her primarily from the latex pieces and her star turn in Artforum, this exhibition pulls together and elaborates her remarkable career in a thrilling way. It proves her work to be at once all over the place and very much of a piece, as well as consistently, irrepressibly ahead of its time. This would seem to be every renegade artist's dream."
Roberta Smith on Lynda Benglis' career

"I can't deny anything the viewer reads into the work; that is the viewer's pleasure, hopefully. I am a permissive artist. I allow things to happen. I believe the viewer is half the work. Duchamp said it and I believe it."

Synopsis

Though best-described as a sculptor, Lynda Benglis is impossible to align with a single movement or medium. In 1968, she began pouring latex or polyurethane foam onto the floor of her studio and into the corners. The resulting forms were both painterly and sculptural. By the 1970s she was casting these works in bronze and incorporating other metals in unusual combinations. Furious when her innovations were ignored by the New York art world, she posed for an outrageous advertisement for an upcoming exhibition of her work, oiled up, wearing nothing but sunglasses, and brandishing an enormous dildo. This infamous act of protest, a deservedly unforgettable moment in Feminist art history, made Benglis famous but failed to call attention to the artist's superb sculptures. Only over the past decade has Benglis begun to receive recognition as a major contributor to late-20th- and 21st-century art.

Key Ideas

Benglis was the first artist to make sculptures out of paint, eliminating the boundary between painting and sculpture - two traditionally separate art forms.
Benglis's work is a continuation of the Abstract Expressionist tradition of dripping and pouring pigment from above. She takes the process one step further, however, eliminating the canvas and pouring directly onto the floor, allowing the walls and corners to shape the piece.
In her use of candy colors, glitter and other craft materials, she distanced herself from the serious, brooding color and macho materials used by her contemporaries. In doing so, she sought to question traditional gendered distinctions in art, above all the opposition between art and craft.
Her willingness to use her own body in art films and play stereotypically feminine roles (her pornstaresque appearance in Artforum in 1974, for example) paved the way for Cindy Sherman and other artists who specialize in experimental role play, and ushered in a new era in self-portraiture.

Biography

Lynda Benglis Photo

Childhood

The eldest of five children, Lynda Benglis was born into a Greek-American family and raised in Lake Charles, Louisiana. Her mother was the daughter of a preacher from Mississippi. Her father ran a business selling building materials, an early influence on her work: "I'm a real fan of surfaces. My father ... had samples of colors and plastics and laminates and woods in his car. I was always very interested."

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Lynda Benglis Biography Continues

Influences and Connections

Influences on Artist
Artists, Friends, Movements
Influenced by Artist
Artists, Friends, Movements
Lynda Benglis
Interactive chart with Lynda Benglis's main influences, and the people and ideas that the artist influenced in turn.
View Influences Chart

Artists

Louise BourgeoisLouise Bourgeois
Andy WarholAndy Warhol
Jackson PollockJackson Pollock
Barnett NewmanBarnett Newman

Personal Contacts

Frank StellaFrank Stella
Bridget RileyBridget Riley

Movements

Pop ArtPop Art
Performance ArtPerformance Art
Abstract ExpressionismAbstract Expressionism
Process ArtProcess Art

Influences on Artist
Lynda Benglis
Lynda Benglis
Years Worked: 1960s - present
Influenced by Artist

Artists

Cindy ShermanCindy Sherman
John BaldessariJohn Baldessari
Roxy PaineRoxy Paine
Matthew BarneyMatthew Barney

Personal Contacts

Robert MorrisRobert Morris
Carl AndreCarl Andre

Movements

Video ArtVideo Art
Body ArtBody Art
Feminist ArtFeminist Art

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Cite this page

Content compiled and written by Anna Souter

Edited and revised, with Synopsis and Key Ideas added by Ruth Epstein

" Artist Overview and Analysis". [Internet]. . TheArtStory.org
Content compiled and written by Anna Souter
Edited and revised, with Synopsis and Key Ideas added by Ruth Epstein
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