Modern Movements and Styles - Full List Performance Art Movements

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Performance Art Movements

These are the important Performance art movements, styles, tendencies, groups, and schools that we currently cover. More are on the way!

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Performance: 15 of 87 Total Movements
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Started: 1933

Ended: 1957

Black Mountain College was an experimental school founded in the middle of the twentieth century on the principles of balancing academics, arts, and manual labor within a democratic, communal society and influnced many important artists.

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Started: 1961

Ended: 1980

Many Performance artists used their bodies as the subjects, and the objects of their art and thereby expressed their distinctive views in the newly liberated social, political, and sexual climate of the 1960s. From different actions involving the body, to acts of physical endurance, tattoos, and even extreme forms of bodily mutilation are all included in the loose movement of Body art.

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Started: 1948

Ended: 1951

CoBrA was an avant-garde art collective spanned the cities of Copenhagen, Brussels, and Amsterdam, focused on elements of spontaneity, experimentation, primitivism, and fantasy

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Started: Mid 1960s

The practice of Conceptual art became popular after the 1960s and presented people with an idea about art, which was more significant than the completion of a tangible and traditional work of 'art'. The aim was to create a concept that obliged people to consider the nature of art itself, and decide for themselves whether what was present was a work of art.

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Started: 1916

Ended: 1924

Dada emerged in the early twentieth century as a literary and artistic movement that celebrated random chance, readymade artworks, and outragous performances. Its practitioners, including Hugo Ball, Tristan Tzara, and Marcel Duchamp, scorned bourgeois conventions of high culture, especially the appreciation for artistic intention and skill.

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Started: 1965

In the digital age, artists would grasp its progressive technologies for their own creative output including television, computers, a/v software, and the internet. Beginning in the 1960s, artists and innovators have expanded art into new, and sometimes virtual, worlds.

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Started: 1960s

Feminist art emerged in the 1960s and '70s to explore questions of sex, power, the body, and the ways in which gender categories structure how we see and understand the world. Developing at the same time as many new media strategies, feminist art frequently involves text, installation, and performance elements.

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Started: 1959

Ended: 1978

Fluxus was an international network of "intermedia" artists of the 1960s who worked in fields ranging from music to performance to the visual arts. Taking their name from the Latin "to flow," Fluxus artists adopted an often anarchic and satirical approach to conventional forms of art, and their ideas paved the way for Conceptual art.

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Started: 1954

Ended: 1972

The Gutai was a Japanese artistic movement that was founded by Jiro Yoshihara in 1954. The group was preoccupied with beauty that is born from things that are damaged or decayed. Members believed the destructive process revealed the inner life of materials and objects.

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Started: 1958

Ended: Early 1970s

The term "happening" was coined by artist Allan Kaprow in 1957 to decribe an art event, often staged or pre-scripted, that requires active participation from an audience to come to full fruition.

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Started: 1954

Kinetic art is usually a sculptural construction comprised of moving components, powered by wind, a motor or the viewers themselves. Its kinesis is what gives the artwork its overall effect, hence the name. The first artwork generally credited as Kinetic Art was Marcel Duchamp's Bicycle Wheel (1913). Some of the medium's most famous practitioners include Alexander Calder, Naum Gabo and Jean Tingeuly.

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Started: Origins in 1910s, Movement in 1960s

Performance art is a modern form of art that emphasizes the experiential and the relationship between performer and audience. It developed in the 1960s with such artists as Yves Klein, Joseph Beuys, Marina Abramovic and Allan Kaprow. Not to be confused with the performing arts (dance, theater and music), Performance art is closely related to Conceptual art, in which any inherent meaning is in the eye of the beholder.

Post-Minimalism Art & Analysis

Post-Minimalism

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Started: 1966

Post-minimalism refers to works that share the "pure" qualities of older Minimalist works but go beyond the formalist or linear aesthetics. Some of the movement's artists include Anish Kapoor, Damien Hirst and Eva Hesse.

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Started: 1911

Ended: 1916

After the Russian Revolution, collaborative groups of futurists formed in St. Petersburg and in Moscow, publishing journals, organizing debates, and curating exhibitions of their work. Artists such as Natalya Goncharova, Kasimir Malevich, and Vladimir Mayakovsky reject past approaches and looked to Russian icongraphy, French Cubism, and the avant-garde of Europe for new directions for art-making.

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Started: 1965

Video art is a medium that employs moving images of various types, but often contains no narrative, characters or discernible storyline. Not to be confused with, for example, the experimental film or cinema, Video art first developed in the 1960s further avant-garde movements such as Performance, Intallation, and Feminist art.

Performance: 15 of 87 Total Movements

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