Modern Movements and Styles - Full List Modern Movements in Early and Pre-War Modern Art

Display Movements by Period:

Early and Pre-War Modern Art1850 - 1914
Early and Pre-War Modern Art
Interwar Modern Art1914 - 1945
Interwar Modern Art
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Post-war Modern Art1945 - 1970
Post-war Modern Art
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Roots of Contemporary Art1970 and Beyond
Roots of Contemporary Art
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Movements and Styles in Early and Pre-War Modern Art

This section provides information about important movements, styles, tendencies, groups, and schools of Modern and Contemporary Art.

Early and Pre-War Modern Art: 29 of 78 Total Movements
Aesthetic Movement Art & Analysis

Aesthetic Movement

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Aesthetic Movement Famous Art

The Aesthetic Movement emerged first in Britain in the late-nineteenth century. Inspired by a rejection of previous styles in both the fine and decorative arts, its adherents were committed to the pursuit of beauty and the doctrine of 'art for art's sake'. Believing that art had declined in an era of utility and rationalism, they claimed that art deserved to be judged on its own terms alone.

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Art Deco Art & Analysis

Art Deco

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Art Deco Famous Art

Art Deco was an eclectic style that flourished in the 1920s and '30s and influenced art, architecture and design. It blended a love of modernity - expressed through geometric shapes and streamlined forms - with references to the classical past and to exotic locations.

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Art Nouveau Art & Analysis

Art Nouveau

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Art Nouveau Famous Art

Art Nouveau was a movement that swept through the decorative arts and architecture in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Artists drew inspiration from both organic and geometric forms, evolving elegant designs that united flowing, natural forms with more angular contours.

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Arts and Crafts Movement Art & Analysis

Arts and Crafts Movement

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Arts and Crafts Movement Famous Art

The Arts and Crafts Movement was an international design movement that originated in Great Britain and had a strong following in the United States. It advocated truth to materials and traditional craftsmanship using simple forms and often medieval, romantic or folk styles of decoration. It also proposed economic and social reform and has been seen as essentially anti-industrial.

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Ashcan School Art & Analysis

Ashcan School

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Ashcan School Famous Art

Founded at the beginning of the twentieth century, the Ashcan School was a loose congregation of American Realist artists that challenged the dominant style of Impressionism in favor of a more naturalistic and socially-engaged approach to painting. Initiated by Robert Henri in Philadelphia, the school later moved to New York, where its central members included George Bellows, George Luks, William Glackens, Edward Hopper, Joan Sloan, and Everett Shinn. Although the group's members incorporated a range of styles, they shared a common interest in depicting contemporary society through both the squalor and vitality of the burgeoning metropolis.

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Cubism Art & Analysis

Cubism

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Cubism Famous Art

Cubism was first developed by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque between 1907-1911. Its classic phase has two stages: 'Analytic', in which forms seem to be 'analyzed' and fragmented; and 'Synthetic', in which foreign materials such as newspaper and wood veneer are collaged to the surface of the canvas. The style attracted many adherents, both in Paris and abroad, and it would later influence the Abstract Expressionists, particularly Willem de Kooning.

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Der Blaue Reiter Art & Analysis

Der Blaue Reiter

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Der Blaue Reiter Famous Art

Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider) was a group of Expressionist painters in Munich, Germany consisting principally of Wassily Kandinsky, Alexej von Jawlensky,Germans Auguste Macke, and Franz Marc. Key interests among them were the aesthetics of primitivism and spiritualism, as well as growing trends in Fauvism and Cubism, which led Kandinsky, chief among the Expressionist artists, to experiment more with abstract art.

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Die Brücke Art & Analysis

Die Brücke

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Die Brücke Famous Art

Die Brücke (The Bridge) was a group of German Expressionist artists that banded together in Dresden in 1905. The group, which includes artists such as Erich Heckel, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, and Emil Nolde, had a major impact on the evolution of modern art in the twentieth century and the creation of Expressionism. Die Bruke artists' used bold colors to depicts gritty scene of city life.

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Expressionism Art & Analysis

Expressionism

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Expressionism Famous Art

Expressionism is a broad term for a host of movements in early twentieth-century Germany, from Die Brücke (1905) and Der Blaue Reiter (1911) to the early Neue Sachlichkeit painters in the 20s and 30s. Many German Expressionists used vivid colors and abstracted forms to create spiritually or psychologically intense works, while others focused on depictions of war, alienation, and the modern city.

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Fauvism Art & Analysis

Fauvism

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Fauvism Famous Art

Fauvism was an early twentieth-century art movement founded by Henri Matisse and André Derain. Labeled "les fauves" or "wild beasts" by critic Louis Vauxcelles, the artists favored vibrant colors and winding gestural strokes across the canvas.

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Futurism Art & Analysis

Futurism

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Futurism Famous Art

Futurism developed in interwar Italy as an ideology that celebrated the speed, movement, machinery, and violence of modern times. Blending realism with collage and Cubist abstraction, its visual components include lines of force and dynamism to indicate objects moving through space.

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Hudson River School Art & Analysis

Hudson River School

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Hudson River School Famous Art

The Hudson River School was a nineteenth century American art movement that celebrated the wilderness and great outdoors. The Hudson River School artists were influenced by the Romantics, using dramatic scenes of nature to express the American ideals of their time: discovery and exploration.

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Impressionism Art & Analysis

Impressionism

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Impressionism Famous Art

Impressionism emerged in the mid-nineteent century in opposition to the finished style of academic painting. It often depicted scenes of daily life, and used painterly strokes and shifting color areas to capture the effects of light and atmosphere.

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Japonism Art & Analysis

Japonism

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Japonism Famous Art

Japonism (Japonisme in French) describes the influence of Japanese art, especially woodblock prints, on French artists in the second half of the nineteenth century. Many Post-Impressionists were influenced by the flat blocks of color, the emphasis on design, and the everyday subject matter.

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Les Nabis Art & Analysis

Les Nabis

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Les Nabis Famous Art

Les Nabis were a group of Post-Impressionist artists in 1890s Paris including Maurice Denis, Pierre Bonnard, and Édouard Vuillard. They combined Impressionist brushstrokes with vivid colors, an at-times mystical or symbolic subject matter, and an interest in patterned and repeating backgrounds.

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Luminism Art & Analysis

Luminism

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Luminism Famous Art

Luminism refers to a mid-nineteenth-century American school of painting, in which artists emphasized the effects of light and shadow in expansive landscapes. Luminism is related to French Impressionism given their respective emphases on light, but differs in that the American artists hid their brushstrokes and paid closer attention to glowing scenes of nature.

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Neo-Impressionism Art & Analysis

Neo-Impressionism

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Neo-Impressionism Famous Art

Neo-Impressionism was founded by Georges Seurat in the 1880s. It brought a new and quasi-scientific approach to the Impressionists' interests in light and color, along with new approaches to the application of paint, sometimes in dots and dashes. Its followers were drawn to modern urban scenes as well as landscapes and seascapes.

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Post-Impressionism Art & Analysis

Post-Impressionism

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Post-Impressionism Famous Art

Post-Impressioism refers to a host of artists and styles that emerged after Impressionism in the late nineteenth century. Although diverse in style, they tend to share an emphasis on intense, sometimes arbitrary, colors, expressive forms, and painterly brushstrokes.

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The Pre-Raphaelites Art & Analysis

The Pre-Raphaelites

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The Pre-Raphaelites Famous Art

The Pre-Raphaelites were a group of English painters whose goal was to reform art by rejecting the classical influences of Raphael, to return to a more mediaval approach to the arts. Romanticism was a great influence on this group and they were interested honest depictions of nature.

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Rayonism Art & Analysis

Rayonism

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Rayonism Famous Art

Rayonism, sometimes refered to as rayism, was an abstract style of painting developed by Russian artists Mikhail Larionov and Natalia Goncharova. The term was derived from the use of dynamic rays of contrasting color that represented lines of reflected light.

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Early and Pre-War Modern Art: 29 of 78 Total Movements



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