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Movements Die Brücke

Die Brücke

Started: 1905

Ended: 1913

Quotes

"To go straight to the point [...] one of the aims of Die Brücke is to attract all the revolutionary and fermenting elements to itself - that's the meaning of the name, 'Brücke.'"
Karl Schmidt-Rottluff
"Wherever I looked, Nature was alive: the sky, the clouds, on every stone and among the branches of the trees, everywhere my creatures stirred or lived their still or wild, lively lives, arousing my excitement and crying out to be painted."
Emil Nolde
"You too, find release only in art, you are one of those privileged people who have that gift, and you will be free and at peace so long as you make use of it."
Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
"Every color holds within it a soul, which makes me happy or repels me, and which acts as a stimulus. To a person who has no art in him, colors are colors, tones tones... and that is all. All their consequences for the human spirit, which range between heaven to hell, just go unnoticed."
Emil Nolde
"All art needs this visible world and will always need it. Quite simply because, being accessible to all, it is the key to all other worlds."
Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
"A painter paints the appearance of things, not their objective correctness; in fact, he creates new appearances of things."
Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
"Art is not a pastime, it is a duty with respect to the people, a public affair."
Max Pechstein
"I really feel pressure to create something that is as strong as possible. The war has really swept away everything from the past."
Karl Schmidt-Rottluff
"The German artist creates out of his imagination, inner vision. The forms of visible nature are to him only a symbol."
Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
"The art of an artist must be his own art. It is...always a continuous chain of little inventions, little technical discoveries of one's own, in relation to the tool, the material and the colors."
Emil Nolde
"The essence of art can never change. I'm convinced you can't talk about art. At best, you will have a translation, a poetic paraphrase, and as for that I'll leave that to the poets."
Karl Schmidt-Rottluff

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Expressionism
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Der Blaue Reiter

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Ernst Ludwig KirchnerErnst Ludwig Kirchner
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Fritz BleylFritz Bleyl
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Karl Schmidt-RottluffKarl Schmidt-Rottluff
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Erich HeckelErich Heckel
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Emil NoldeEmil Nolde
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Max PechsteinMax Pechstein
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Synopsis

Progenitors of the movement later known as German Expressionism, Die Brücke formed in Dresden in 1905 as a bohemian collective of artists in staunch opposition to the older, established bourgeois social order of Germany. Their art confronted feelings of alienation from the modern world by reaching back to pre-academic forms of expression including woodcut prints, carved wooden sculptures, and "primitive" modes of painting. This quest for authentic emotion led to an expressive style characterized by heightened color and a direct, simplified approach to form.

Key Ideas

Die Brücke is typically seen as the fountainhead of German Expressionism, chronologically the first of two groups (the other being Der Blaue Reiter) that pushed German modern art onto the international avant-garde scene.
None of the four founding members of Die Brücke, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Fritz Bleyl, Erich Heckel, and Karl Schmidt-Rottluff, had received any formal education in the visual arts. They stressed the value of youth and intuition in escaping the intellectual cul-de-sac of academic thought focused on copying earlier models.
The name Die Brücke was chosen to indicate the group's desire to "bridge" the past and present. From the past, they chose to reassert Germany's rich artistic history, taking inspiration from the print and painting techniques of Albrecht Dürer, Matthias Grünewald, and Lucas Cranach the Elder. Developing the modern example of expressive colorists like Vincent van Gogh, Edvard Munch, and Henri Matisse, sharp and sometimes violently clashing colors are often used in Die Brücke painting to jolt the viewer into the experience of a particular emotion.
For the artists of Die Brücke, escaping the academy was part of a larger mission to escape the strictures of modern middle-class life. Nudity and explorations of free sexuality in their work (in domestic interiors and in nature) are often contrasted with images of the city, where human interaction is uncomfortably negotiated through prescribed social attitudes.

Most Important Art

Standing Child (1910)
Artist: Erich Heckel
In their studies toward a modern, expressionistic art, the Die Brücke group regularly sketched, painted, and printed images of two young neighborhood girls they used as models, one of whom, "Franzi," (Lina Franziska Fehrmann) Erich Heckel depicts here. The artists' desire for freedom of expression was mirrored in the free movement and relative lack of inhibition of their young muses. In Heckel's woodcut Standing Child, Franzi's pose and slight grin indicate a lack of shame about her nakedness, while her skinny, immature body provides a visual analog for the artist's angularity and simplification of form. Rendered in stark, unmodulated white, her nudity contrasts with the red and green background tones. Heckel also continued the contour of her nose into the accentuated curves of her eyebrows, a formal convention he culled from non-Western masks he studied in Dresden's Ethnological Museum.
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Die Brücke Artworks in Focus:
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Beginnings

Birth of Die Brücke in Dresden, 1905

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and Fritz Bleyl met in 1901 at the Technical Institute of Dresden as architecture students interested in Germany's Jugendstil tradition, a local variant of Art Nouveau, and became fast friends. Erich Heckel and Karl Schmidt-Rottluff, a few years younger, met in grammar school in 1902 before enrolling in the Technical Institute in 1904 and 1905, respectively. In June 1905, the four students, now friendly colleagues, decided to form an artist's group opposed to tradition and the academic nature of their prior education. The idea of being a collective of artists was central to their thought, and it was established early on that Die Brücke artists would not exhibit outside of the group without permission from the other members. They exhibited aggressively, mounting over 70 shows in their brief eight-year tenure as a collective.

A Bohemian Colony

At the group's genesis, the artists of Die Brücke envisioned themselves primarily as a bohemian collective of artists. This idea was likely influenced by the precedent of Worpswede, an artists' colony in northern Germany established in the 1880s that brought cultural luminaries such as the early Expressionist painter Paula Modersohn-Becker and the writers Thomas Mann and Rainer Maria Rilke into a communal living and working situation.

If Worpswede suggested to Die Brücke that a communal, outdoor lifestyle might be preferable and more natural than city life, Modersohn-Becker's paintings of female nudes (including some self-portraits) in domestic and outdoor settings set the tone for their choice of theme. In Die Brücke's early stages, Kirchner's apartment served as a laissez-faire venue for nude life-drawing sessions and casual lovemaking. This led to what has been referred to as the "vital eroticism" of Die Brücke painting.

New Members, New Personalities

Die Brücke Beginnings

Despite their collective mentality, certain members of Die Brücke held distinct roles in the group. Heckel, for example, became the de facto business manager of the group due to his personable attitude and art world connections. However, Kirchner is typically considered the group's leader, largely due to his attempts to theoretically direct the group, the widely held opinion that his art best exemplified the Die Brücke style, and the fact that he wrote the group's first history, the Chronik der Brücke, in 1913.

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Bleyl, who would leave the group in 1907, is often considered as less "important" than Max Pechstein, who joined in 1906. Having met Heckel in 1906 while studying at the Royal Art Academy in Dresden, Pechstein joined the group's lively discussions and came to them as the first member with prior education in painting. Art critics quickly identified him as the "purest" painter of the group, and he was the most financially successful during the group's tenure. Emil Nolde, who was thirteen years older than Kirchner and Bleyl and had been producing work for decades, was invited to join Die Brücke after the artists saw his work at a local exhibition.

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Die Brücke Overview Continues

The First Die Brücke Exhibition, September-October 1906

In 1906, Heckel obtained permission to host the group's first exhibition at the Karl-Max Seifert lamp factory and showroom in September and October that year. The theme of the exhibition was the female nude, which was advertised by a lithographic poster of a semi-abstract woman created by Bleyl. The exhibition was accompanied by a woodcut leaflet by Kirchner that stated the group's ideals:

"With faith in evolution, in a new generation of creators and connoisseurs, we call together all youth. And as youths, who embody the future, we want to free our lives and limbs from the long-established older powers. Anyone who renders his creative drive directly and genuinely is one of us."

Though the show was not a critical success, the experimentation of the young group was on display for the first time, heralding the rise of Germany's first avant-garde movement. Moreover, the group marketed itself to ensure financial sustainability in the future, seeking both "active members" (artists) and "passive members" (donors).

Developing the Die Brücke Aesthetic

Bleyl broke with the group in 1907 to start a family, and Nolde left shortly after,, apparently unwilling to follow the group's rigid exhibition policy. The core of the group was still set, however, with Kirchner, Heckel, Schmidt-Rottluff, and Pechstein working together to establish a radical modern style in German art.

From 1907 to 1911, the group spent a large portion of its time in Dresden, planning exhibitions and using Kirchner's apartment as a hangout and studio. Pechstein moved to Berlin in 1908, but he would often return in the summers, and the artists would pair off and head out of the city to seek the simplicity of nature, particularly near the lakes of Moritzburg. It was during this time that the artists also began frequenting Dresden's Ethnological Museum, developing an interest in Primitivism, which would prove highly influential on their group style.

Inspiring New Expressionisms

After his move to Berlin, Pechstein exhibited with the Berlin Secession, until his and some of his young contemporaries' work was rejected from one of their exhibitions for being too "expressionist," and he helped found the Neue Sezession (New Secession) in 1910. Pechstein succeeded in bringing his Die Brücke cohorts to exhibit with the Neue Sezession in 1910, where they came into contact with and ultimately recruited Otto Mueller.

By 1910, the Expressionist style had developed in Dresden, and Die Brücke had become so popular among young artists that it inspired secession movements in the nation's capital. Indeed, the movement had become known across Germany via its wide-traveling exhibitions. Beyond Berlin, Wassily Kandinsky had formed the Neue Kunstvereinigung Munchen (Munich New Artists' Association) in Munich in 1909, which was something of an incubator for the artistic and theoretical ideas he would promulgate in Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider) from 1911 to 1914.

The other major movement within German Expressionism, Der Blaue Reiter focused on abstraction in art and claimed that colors held a spiritual value beyond the emotional value attributed to them by Die Brücke. Though they pursued different goals, the two movements tilled common artistic ground and often addressed similar themes, and by the 1910s, works from both groups could be seen in the same exhibitions.

The Move to Berlin

In 1911, Kirchner persuaded the rest of the Dresden painters to move to Berlin, where he had joined Pechstein to found the private art school Moderner Unterricht im Malen Institut (Modern Teaching of Painting Institute) as a way of promoting their new, modern artistic convictions. The group became more involved with the international avant-garde movements of Italian Futurism and French Cubism as a result of the move to the major metropolis, with each artist responding differently to new stimuli. Kirchner, for better or worse, felt enervated in Berlin, and his work took on a more agitated, dynamic quality. Heckel felt alienated by the metropolis, and his color palette became more subdued, while Schmidt-Rottluff embraced its modernity and began to incorporate the fragmented geometry of Cubism and Futurism in his work. The Die Brücke artists would remain in Berlin until their formal breakup in 1913.

Concepts and Styles

In the City, or Of the City?

The artists of Die Brücke derived a great deal of tension in their art from a paradox: though the artists lived in the cities of Dresden and then Berlin, to some extent they never considered themselves of the city. The modern city, as depicted in Die Brücke paintings, is a fantastic realm of attraction and repulsion. To separate themselves from their bourgeois backgrounds, the artists settled into a rebuilt butcher shop in a working-class neighborhood; however, it is unclear how often they roamed those streets for their art, as many of their city images depict wealthy or at least commercial areas.

Nevertheless, the formal qualities of their art were undoubtedly influenced by their experience of urban living. Clashing tones and angular, almost belligerent brushstrokes compose many of their images, even before their contact with the faceting of Cubism and Futurism. While their color choices took on some of the luminosity of the country during their ex-urban travels, their work largely speaks of the experience of modernity through city life.

Nature and Naturism

The artists of Die Brücke did, however, spend quite a lot of time outside of the city, in an attempt to escape the urban landscape. Among Germany's lakes and forests, they were able to live closer to their ideal of a bohemian artists' collective. Their canvases reflected this, turning from urban alienation to themes of happy men and women cavorting naked in nature. Naturism, the philosophy of social nudity, had been defended in German intellectual circles around the turn of the century, and the Die Brücke artists embraced it as part of their radical rejection of bourgeois social norms.

Primitivism and Ethnology

Another concept with which Die Brücke hoped to overturn stale social and academic conventions was Primitivism. Both Dresden and Berlin housed ethnological museums that allowed the group to view African, Pacific, and American artifacts, which they studied for aesthetic inspiration. Though "Primitivism" has negative connotations in the postcolonial era, its use in the arts constituted a genuine attempt on the behalf of modern artists to break through the intellectual constraints of modern Western society by reaching to a "simpler" and potentially "freer" means of expression in less-developed parts of the world. For the artists of Die Brücke (and, for that matter, their contemporaries the Fauves, the Cubists, and the artists of Der Blaue Reiter), this meant their art often evinced a less laborious, more direct rendering of form far from the obsessive pursuit of naturalism and beauty that had previously been considered the highest goal of art.

Printmaking: the Woodcut and the Linocut

Perhaps one of Die Brücke's most original contributions to modern art was the reintroduction of woodblock printing. Germany possessed a storied lineage of printmaking that reached back through the Renaissance-era masters Martin Schongauer and Albrecht Dürer to the stark, angular, and often grainy prints that survived from the Middle Ages. In an attempt to find the most direct form of expression, the artists of Die Brücke regained the techniques of artisan printmakers almost one-thousand years deceased and used them to make powerful statements with strong contrasts. In addition, they modernized this age-old technique by innovating the linocut, which accomplished a similar effect through the use of modern linoleum, which was easier to gouge into than wood.

Later Developments

The collective impulse that pushed Die Brücke to its greatest work was ultimately part of the group's undoing. In 1912, Pechstein was expelled from the group for exhibiting work at the Neue Sezession without their consent. The artists' attitudes toward each other began to deteriorate, with some arguments centering around cordial disagreements over artistic and theoretical issues, and some moving beyond to personal conflict. The final straw was Kirchner's authorship of the Chronik der Brücke in 1913, where he emphasized his achievements, claimed that Pechstein had "betrayed" the group by exhibiting with the Neue Sezession, and denied any outside influence from Cubism or Futurism. The other members of the group rejected the draft, and Die Brücke dissolved.

As the largely figurative German Expressionist corollary to Kandinsky and Der Blaue Reiter's semi-abstract group, Die Brücke was extremely influential for twentieth-century modernism. Despite Kirchner's assertion that Die Brücke was a wholly German movement, the internationally followed 1912 Sonderbund exhibition in Cologne was centered around the debt that modern art, including Expressionism, owed to van Gogh, Munch, and other modern artists. This ensured that Die Brücke would be recognized internationally as an important player in the development of twentieth-century modernism.

The following decades saw a host of artists from across Europe take up the figurative Expressionist style begun by Die Brücke. In Germany, Otto Dix and George Grosz were Expressionists influenced by the group who ultimately developed the next major German art movement Neue Sachlichkeit. In Austria, Egon Schiele and Oskar Kokoschka exemplified an idea of artist-as-outcast in a style that drew on Kirchner's example.

And if the abstract variant of Expressionism cultivated by Der Blaue Reiter was a touchstone for Abstract Expressionism in the United States in the work of artists like Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko, Die Brücke remained an influence on its semi-figurative painters like Willem de Kooning and Philip Guston, whose post-World War II images revised some of the alienation of late Die Brücke canvases. The same could be said for the art of post-WWII Britain, where Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud created distorted and psychologically penetrating figural paintings, often of individuals.

Neo-Expressionism, a painterly reaction to the popularity of Conceptual art and Minimalism in the 1970s, was an explicit reach back to Die Brücke artists like Nolde and Kirchner, and the style dominated the art world well into the 1980s through the works of artists like Georg Baselitz, Anselm Kiefer, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Julian Schnabel, and David Hockney.




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Useful Resources on Die Brücke

Books
Websites
Articles
Videos
More
The books and articles below constitute a bibliography of the sources used in the writing this page. These also suggest some accessible resources for further research, especially ones that can be found and purchased via the internet.
Brücke: The Birth of Expressionism in Dresden and Berlin, 1905-1913

By Reinhold Heller

Brücke

By Ulrike Lorenz

New Perspectives on Brücke Expressionism: Bridging History

By Christian Weikop

German Expressionism: Die Brücke and Der Blaue Reiter

By Barry Herbert

BMA Exhibit Explores German Expressionism

By Tim Smith
The Baltimore Sun
February 1, 2014

Die Brücke: Origins of Expressionism

By Philippe Dagen
The Guardian
May 8, 2012

An Expressionist from a Brutal Time

By Roberta Smith
The New York Times
March 7, 2003

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Expressionism
Expressionism
Expressionism
Expressionism is a broad term for a host of movements in early twentieth-century Germany and beyond, from Die Brücke (1905) and Der Blaue Reiter (1911) to the early Neue Sachlichkeit painters in the 1920s and '30s. Many Expressionists used vivid colors and abstracted forms to create spiritually or psychologically intense works, while others focused on depictions of war, alienation, and the modern city.
TheArtStory: Expressionism
Der Blaue Reiter
Der Blaue Reiter
Der Blaue Reiter
Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider) was a group of Expressionist painters in Munich, Germany consisting principally of Wassily Kandinsky, Alexej von Jawlensky,Germans Auguste Macke, and Franz Marc. Key interests among them were the aesthetics of primitivism and spiritualism, as well as growing trends in Fauvism and Cubism, which led Kandinsky, chief among the Expressionist artists, to experiment more with abstract art.
TheArtStory: Der Blaue Reiter
Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
Ernst Ludwig Kirchner was one of the driving forces in the Die Brücke group that flourished in Dresden and Berlin before WWI, and one of the most talented and influential of the Expressionists.
TheArtStory: Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
Fritz Bleyl
Fritz Bleyl
Fritz Bleyl
Fritz Bleyl was a German Expressionist artist, and one of the four founders of Die Brucke. He designed graphics for the group, which graced group posters. He left Die Brucke after two years to look after his family. He did not exhibit publicly thereafter.
Fritz Bleyl
Erich Heckel
Erich Heckel
Erich Heckel
Erich Heckel was a German painter and printmaker. He was a founding member of the German Expressionist group Die Brucke. The Nazi party declared his work degenerate and forbade him to show his work in public. By 1944 all of his woodcut blocks and print plates had been destroyed.
Erich Heckel
Karl Schmidt-Rottluff
Karl Schmidt-Rottluff
Karl Schmidt-Rottluff
Karl Schmidt-Rottluff was a German Expressionist painter and printmaker, and a member of Die Brucke. In 1937, 608 of his paintings were seized by the Nazis and several of them were shown in exhibitions of Degenerate art.
Karl Schmidt-Rottluff
Vincent van Gogh
Vincent van Gogh
Vincent van Gogh
Vincent van Gogh was a Dutch painter, commonly associated with the Post-Impressionist period. As one of the most prolific and experimental artists of his time, van Gogh was a spontaneous painter and a master of color and perspective. Troubled by personal demons all his life, many historians speculate that van Gogh suffered from a Bipolar disorder.
TheArtStory: Vincent van Gogh
Edvard Munch
Edvard Munch
Edvard Munch
Norweigan painter and printmaker Edvard Munch was a pioneer of the German Expressionist movement. His works such as The Scream explored deeply psychological concepts in a Symbolist style.
TheArtStory: Edvard Munch
Henri Matisse
Henri Matisse
Henri Matisse
Henri Matisse was a French painter and sculptor who helped forge modern art. From his early Fauvist works to his late cutouts, he emphasized expansive fields of color, the expressive potential of gesture, and the sensuality inherent in art-making.
TheArtStory: Henri Matisse
Art Nouveau
Art Nouveau
Art Nouveau
Art Nouveau was a movement that swept through the decorative arts and architecture in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Generating enthusiasts throughout Europe, it was aimed at modernizing design and escaping the eclectic historical styles that had previously been popular. It drew inspiration from both organic and geometric forms, evolving elegant designs that united flowing, natural forms with more angular contours.
TheArtStory: Art Nouveau
Max Pechstein
Max Pechstein
Max Pechstein
Max Pechstein was a German painter and printmaker. A member of the art group, Die Brucke, Pechstein is best-known for his colorful expressionist paintings influenced by Van Gogh and Matisse. Much of Pechstein's works were deemed 'degenerate' art, confiscated by the Nazis, and displayed in their "Degenerate Art" exhibit of 1937.
Max Pechstein
Emil Nolde
Emil Nolde
Emil Nolde
Emil Nolde was a Danish-German painter and printmaker who was affiliated with the groups Die Brucke, the Berlin Secession, and Der Blaue Reiter. Nolde was best-known for his bright, evocative paintings of people and flowers.
Emil Nolde
Primitive Art
Primitive Art
Primitive Art
Nineteenth- and twentieth-century artists in the West were greatly influenced by art they deemed 'primitive' or 'naïve', made by tribal or non-Western cultures. Such art, ranging from African and Native American to naive depictions of the French peasantry, was thought to be less civilized and thus closer to raw aesthetic and spiritual experience.
Primitive Art
Otto Mueller
Otto Mueller
Otto Mueller
Otto Mueller was a German painter and printmaker of the Die Brucke Expressionist movement. The central topic in Mueller's works was the unity of humans and nature. His paintings focus on the simplification of form, color and contours. He is especially known for his paintings of nudes and Gypsy women.
Otto Mueller
Wassily Kandinsky
Wassily Kandinsky
Wassily Kandinsky
A member of the German Expressionist group Der Blaue Reiter, and later a teacher at the Bauhaus, Kandinsky is best known for his pioneering breakthrough into expressive abstraction in 1913. His work prefigures that of the American Abstract Expressionists.
TheArtStory: Wassily Kandinsky
Futurism
Futurism
Futurism
Futurism was the most influential Italian avant-garde movement of the twentieth century. Dedicated to the modern age, it celebrated speed, movement, machinery and violence. At first influenced by Neo-Impressionism, and later by Cubism, some of its members were also drawn to mass culture and nontraditional forms of art.
TheArtStory: Futurism
Cubism
Cubism
Cubism
Cubism was developed by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque between 1907-1911, and it continued to be highly influential long after its decline. This classic phase has two stages: 'Analytic', in which forms seem to be 'analyzed' and fragmented; and 'Synthetic', in which pre-existing materials such as newspaper and wood veneer are collaged to the surface of the canvas.
TheArtStory: Cubism
Otto Dix
Otto Dix
Otto Dix
Otto Dix is one of modern painting's most savage satirists. After many artists had abandoned portraiture for abstraction in the 1910s, Dix injected sharp caricatures into his pictures of some of the leading lights of German society. His other narrative subjects are remembered for their indictment of corrupt and immoral life in the modern city.
TheArtStory: Otto Dix
George Grosz
George Grosz
George Grosz
George Grosz was a German Dada and Neue Sachlichkeit artist. He was enamored of America and highly critical of Weimar society. Grosz immigrated to the United States just as Hitler came to power and opened a private art school in Des Moines.
TheArtStory: George Grosz
New Objectivity
New Objectivity
New Objectivity
New Objectivity, or Neue Sachlichkeit, was a style of German art that emerged in the 1920s in reaction to the more irrational tone of pre-WWI Expressionism. Some artists associated with it, such as Otto Dix, were savagely satirical and critical of society, while others evolved a cool and classical style that echoes many other European art movements at this time.
New Objectivity
Egon Schiele
Egon Schiele
Egon Schiele
Egon Schiele was an Austrian Art Nouveau painter. Schiele was initially taken under the wing of Gustav Klimt, but soon discovered a painterly style that was solidly expressionistic in form. While his style was reminiscent of Van Gogh, Klimt, Munch and others, Schiele shaped the female form in a uniquely non-representational manner, often twisting the body and face, making him an early proponent of European Expressionism.
TheArtStory: Egon Schiele
Oskar Kokoschka
Oskar Kokoschka
Oskar Kokoschka
Oskar Kokoschka was an Austrian Expressionist painter, poet and playwright. His work is intertwined with the stormy and dramatic life of affairs, fleeing the Nazis and eventually settling in Switzerland as a master of German Expressionism.
Oskar Kokoschka
Abstract Expressionism
Abstract Expressionism
Abstract Expressionism
A tendency among New York painters of the late 1940s and '50s, all of whom were committed to an expressive art of profound emotion and universal themes. The movement embraced the gestural abstraction of Willem de Kooning and Jackson Pollock, and the color field painting of Mark Rothko and others. It blended elements of Surrealism and abstract art in an effort to create a new style fitted to the postwar mood of anxiety and trauma.
TheArtStory: Abstract Expressionism
Jackson Pollock
Jackson Pollock
Jackson Pollock
Jackson Pollock was the most well-known Abstract Expressionist and the key example of Action Painting. His work ranges from Jungian scenes of primitive rites to the purely abstract "drip paintings" of his later career.
TheArtStory: Jackson Pollock
Mark Rothko
Mark Rothko
Mark Rothko
Mark Rothko was an Abstract Expressionist painter whose early interest in mythic landscapes gave way to mature works featuring large, hovering blocks of color on colored grounds.
TheArtStory: Mark Rothko
Willem de Kooning
Willem de Kooning
Willem de Kooning
Willem de Kooning, a Dutch immigrant to New York, was one of the foremost Abstract Expressionist painters. His abstract compositions drew on Surrealist and figurative traditions, and typified the expressionistic 'gestural' style of the New York School.
TheArtStory: Willem de Kooning
Philip Guston
Philip Guston
Philip Guston
Initially associated with the New York School of abstract art, Guston famously abandoned pure abstraction in the 1950s and turned to figurative art and quasi-abstract cartoon imagery. His later work, for which he is best known, was a major influence on the development of Neo-Expressionism in the U.S.
TheArtStory: Philip Guston
Francis Bacon
Francis Bacon
Francis Bacon
Francis Bacon was an Irish-born, English painter and one of the twentieth century's most celebrated and controversial existentialist artists. Bacon favored dark subject matter, often painting slightly abstracted, biomorphic figures, with bodies contorted or in the throes of madness. Painterly themes of Bacon's include the crucifixion, isolation and the mind's fragility. Bacon was also one of the few English artists of any prominence in modern and contemporary circles during the better part of the twentieth century.
TheArtStory: Francis Bacon
Lucian Freud
Lucian Freud
Lucian Freud
Lucian Freud is a German-British painter, and the grandson of Sigmund Freud. He devoted himself almost entirely to portraiture, applying richer colors and impasto brushstrokes. In 2000 he was commissioned to paint England's Queen Elizabeth II.
TheArtStory: Lucian Freud
Neo-Expressionism
Neo-Expressionism
Neo-Expressionism
Neo-Expressionism began as a movement in German art in the early 1960s with the emergence of Georg Baselitz. It gained momentum, and drew in painters from Germany and the United States - often bringing artists back to painting as a serious and contemporary medium for artistic exploration.
TheArtStory: Neo-Expressionism
Conceptual Art
Conceptual Art
Conceptual Art
Conceptual art describes an influential movement that first emerged in the mid-1960s and prized ideas over the formal or visual components of traditional works of art. The artists often challenged old concepts such as beauty and quality; they also questioned the conventional means by which the public consumed art; and they rejected the conventional art object in favor of diverse mediums, ranging from maps and diagrams to texts and videos.
TheArtStory: Conceptual Art
Minimalism
Minimalism
Minimalism
Minimalism emerged as a movement in New York in the 1960s, its leading figures creating objects which blurred the boundaries between painting and sculpture, and were characterized by unitary, geometric forms and industrial materials. Emphasizing cool anonymity over the passionate expression of the previous generation of painters, the Minimalists attempted to avoid metaphorical associations, symbolism, and suggestions of spiritual transcendence.
TheArtStory: Minimalism
Georg Baselitz
Georg Baselitz
Georg Baselitz
Georg Baselitz is a twentieth century German painter and sculptor, and was an originator of the Neo-Expressionist group "Neue Wilden," which focused on subject-based painting and the importance of color. Much of Baselitz's work is noted for its provocative subject matter, often sexual or overtly dark in nature.
TheArtStory: Georg Baselitz
Anselm Kiefer
Anselm Kiefer
Anselm Kiefer
Anselm Kiefer is a German painter and sculptor, and was a pioneer of the late-twentieth-century movement Neo-Expressionism. Kiefer's mixed-media art typically incorporates straw, clay, lead and shellac, in addition to traditional paint and canvas. The themes of his work often focus on the atrocities of the Holocaust, as well as the occult, cosmos, and mythology.
TheArtStory: Anselm Kiefer
Jean-Michel Basquiat
Jean-Michel Basquiat
Jean-Michel Basquiat
Jean-Michel Basquiat was an American painter who rose to fame in the 1980s, and was the first African-American artist to gain international acclaim. His emotionally-charged paintings gave rise to graffiti art and the Neo-Expressionist movement, and are still considered among the most avant-garde artworks of the late twentieth century.
TheArtStory: Jean-Michel Basquiat
Julian Schnabel
Julian Schnabel
Julian Schnabel
Julian Schnabel is an American painter, interior decorator and filmmaker. In addition to being a major figure in the Neo-Expressionist movement, he is most well-known as the director of such films as Basquiat and The Diving Bell and the Butterfly.
TheArtStory: Julian Schnabel
David Hockney
David Hockney
David Hockney
David Hockney is an English painter, photographer, collagist and designer. Hockney's influence was particularly felt during the Pop art movement on the 1960s, yet his work has also suggested mixed media and expressionistic tendencies. Although based in London for most of his career, Hockney's most famous paintings occurred during an extended trip to Los Angeles, in which he painted a series of scenes inspired by swimming pools.
TheArtStory: David Hockney
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