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Artists Yves Tanguy

Yves Tanguy

French Painter

Movement: Surrealism

Born: Jan 5, 1900 - Paris, France

Died: January 15, 1955 - Woodbury, Connecticut

Quotes

"I believe there is little to gain by exchanging opinions with other artists concerning either the ideology of art or technical methods. Very much alone in my work, I am almost jealous of it. Geography has no bearing on it, not have the interests of the community in which I work."
Yves Tanguy
"I found that if I planned a picture beforehand, it never surprised me, and surprises are my pleasure in painting."
Yves Tanguy
"What is Surrealism? It is Yves Tanguy, crowned with the big emerald bird of Paradise."
André Breton
"From the ends of the earth to the twilight of today/Nothing can withstand my desolate images."
Yves Tanguy
"The painter of a terrible grace, in the air, below the ground and on the sea."
André Breton
"Perhaps the only true surrealist - almost like a medium."
Kay Sage

"I cannot, nor, consequently, want to try to give a definition, even a simple one, to what I paint. If I did try, I would risk very much closing myself in a definition that would later become like a prison for me."

Synopsis

Yves Tanguy was in many respects the quintessential Surrealist. A sociable eccentric who ate spiders as a party trick, and a close friend of Andre Breton, Tanguy was best-known for his misshapen rocks and molten surfaces that lent definition to the Surrealist aesthetic. Self-taught but enormously skilled, Tanguy painted a hyper-real world with exacting precision. His landscapes, a high-octane blend of fact and fiction, captured the attention of important artists and thinkers from Salvador Dalí to Mark Rothko who admitted their debt to the older artist. And even Carl Gustave Jung used a canvas by Tanguy to illustrate his theory of the collective unconscious.

Key Ideas

Tanguy's symbolism is personal, reflecting his obsession with childhood memory, dreams, hallucinations and psychotic episodes. It defies explicit interpretation, and evokes a range of associations that engage the viewer's imagination and emotions.
Tanguy's landscapes strike a balance between realism and fantasy. Naturalistically-depicted objects hover in midair, or drift toward the sky. Masterful manipulations of scale and perspective, and keen observations of the natural world contribute to the hallucinatory effect of his scenes. His bizarre rock formations were most likely inspired by the terrain of Brittany, where his mother lived.
Like other Surrealists, Tanguy was preoccupied with dreams and the unconscious. What set him apart was the naturalistic precision with which he depicted the mind and its contents. This was his key contribution. More vividly than any artist before him, Tanguy imagined and depicted the unconscious as a place.

Most Important Art

Mama, Papa is Wounded! (1927)
The vast space, wan palette, and unearthly light in this picture evoke a post-apocalyptic wasteland. Airborne objects cast dark shadows, echoing the work of the earlier Surrealist Giorgio de Chirico. The cactus-like shape tethered to a geometric spider-web, and floating near the horizon, seems neither captive nor fully free. Typical of the relationship between words and images in Surrealism, the title complicates rather than clarifies the meaning of the work. With Breton (who, as a war medic, had used Sigmund Freud's methods to treat psychologically damaged soldiers) Tanguy combed psychiatric case studies of patients whose statements could be used as ideas for pictures and titles. According to Tanguy, Mama, Papa is Wounded! was among them. Various interpretations of this picture have been suggested. For example, that it references the violence of World War I and expressed the mood of heightened anxiety that followed. Or that the standing yellow figure may represent a father, the cactus a mother, and the amorphous mass a child. The work remains enigmatic, however, refusing to reveal its secrets, and reflecting the intentional ambiguity of Surrealist symbolism.
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Biography

Childhood

Tanguy was born into a maritime family. His father was a sea captain and the family lived at the Ministere de la Marine in the Place de La Concorde. The seas, skies and stones of the the Finistère coasts in Brittany, where Tanguy spent his summers as a child, appear in his mature work. His early life dealt him some hard blows - his father died in 1908 and his brother died in the First World War. His mother moved to Locronan, Finistère, but Tanguy stayed in Paris to complete his education. As a teenager, Tanguy was lucky enough to make friends with Pierre Matisse (son of Henri Matisse) whose encouragement and support would be crucial to his artistic career, which did not begin immediately. His family expected him to join the Merchant Navy and so he did, working on cargo boats between South America and Africa from 1918-1919. In 1920 he was conscripted into the French Army in Tunis, where he met the poet Jacques Prévert who delighted in Tanguy's eccentricity and strange habits - from chewing his socks to eating live spiders. The latter became a party trick that he would often repeat.

Early Period

After his release from the army disillusioned with convention, Tanguy and Prévert adopted a bohemian lifestyle in Montparnasse. They moved in with the writer Marcel Duhamel at 54 rue du Château, which became an informal gathering spot for artists and writers. This intense but aimless period of his life came to a halt in 1923, when a chance encounter changed his life. While passing by a gallery window in Paris, Tanguy saw de Chirico's, Le Cerveau de L'enfant, and the experience of the picture was so electrifying that he decided to become a painter at once. Other early sources of inspiration for the young Tanguy were Hieronymus Bosch, Lucas Cranach, and Paulo Uccello, Renaissance masters, whose luminous color and perspective he would learn to emulate.

In 1924 he was introduced to André Breton, poet and author of the Surrealist Manifesto (1924), and attended the first Surrealist exhibition in 1925. From then on, Tanguy was a passionate believer, whose startling blue eyes and proto-punk hair made him something of a Surrealist mascot. Breton wrote: "What is Surrealism? It is the appearance of Yves Tanguy, crowned with the big emerald bird of Paradise." Tanguy, in turn, idolized Breton, and called him 'Papa'. Tanguy was among the most loyal members of the Surrealist movement, contributing to manifestos, magazines, and exhibitions. Tanguy's solo exhibition in 1927 was accompanied by a catalogue that praised the artist's skillful distortions as the ultimate Surrealist expression, conveying the overall mistrust of reality that characterized the movement. Taking his cue from psychoanalyst Carl Jung, who urged his patients to begin with their dream, and work outwards, he painted backgrounds and shadows first, before adding his unique bone-like forms. Neither animal nor vegetable nor mineral, Tanguy's creations crawl, arch, sink and fly. Breton called them 'subject-objects' - they are solid and have shadows, yet exist in unreal perspectives with zero gravity. They are both real and unreal - further illustrated by Tanguy's 1931 article Poids et Couleurs (Weights and Colors) where he created hand-shaped subject-objects of pink plush, pearly celluloid, plaster, straw, wax and mercury.

Yves Tanguy having fun

The Surrealist aim was confrontation, and some early reactions to Tanguy's work were violent. In 1930, his early works were exhibited at the Paris screening of Dalí and Buñuels' L'Âge d'Or. The film's sex and violence led to a riot and three of his paintings were slashed to pieces. Despite this adverse reaction, Tanguy continued to love cinema and was inspired, in particular, by its ability to capture motion. He also illustrated Surrealist works of literature, such as Louis Aragon's La Grande Gaîté (1929) and Paul Eluard's "La Vie Immediate" (1932). Loyal to Breton, he signed the second Manifest Surrealiste in 1930, and the collective letter in 1934 expelling Dalí from the group for his pro-Hitler comments.

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Yves Tanguy Biography Continues

Middle Period

By the mid-1930s, Tanguy had both fame and money. His reputation grew with exhibitions in Paris, Belgium, England, New York, Tenerife and the Guggenheim Jeune. Yet Tanguy saw both prestige and wealth as unimportant, even objectionable. On drunken nights in Paris, friends saw him roll banknotes into balls and throw them at bemused cafe patrons. He began a passionate affair with Peggy Guggenheim, once telling her that money confused him and he wished he had not got so much of it all at once. Their affair ended when he met his future wife, the surrealist painter Kay Sage. In 1939 he and Sage moved to America to paint and travel, and married in Reno, Nevada in 1940. Once in America his work still made no concession to reality, but he added vibrant reds and yellows to his chalky greys, inspired by the American landscape. Breton brilliantly summarized this new color palette as: "nasturtium, cock-of-the-rock, poplar leaf, rusty wellchain, cut sodium, slate, jellyfish and cinnamon." Tanguy continued to manipulate scale and perspective, noting that the increased light and space of America gave him a feeling of "more room." Yet he began to fill his work with clusters of subject-objects, no longer widely spaced apart. Their textures changed too, from bone and rock, to cloth, wood, resin, and plastic.

Yves Tanguy photo

In 1942 Tanguy's painting Time and Again was featured in Matisse's famous Artists en Exil exhibition. Other artists invited to contribute were Roberto Matta, Ossip Zadkine, Max Ernst, Marc Chagall, Fernand Leger, Andre Breton, Piet Mondrian, Andre Masson, Amédée Ozenfant, Jacques Lipchitz, Pavel Tchelitchew, Kurt Seligmann, and Eugene Berman, all of whom had fled World War II. His iconic reputation continued to grow with 1943-1945 exhibitions at Pierre Matisse's gallery and a joint exhibition with Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko at Peggy Guggenheim's Art of the Century (1944). He and Sage settled in Woodbury, Connecticut, painting each day and reviewing each other's work. His compositions show the influence of Sage's larger, geometric forms. He had advanced from pure automatism and now sketched his compositions first. Tension grew in his relationship with 'Papa' Breton, who tended to excommunicate Surrealists (Max Ernst, for example) with whom he was unhappy, resented Tanguy's fame and insufficiently unconscious way of working. He ultimately denounced Tanguy as 'bourgeois', and demanded that Pierre Matisse break with him. Tanguy was furious, and the mutual enmity lasted for years.

Later Work

Now an American citizen, Tanguy traveled widely in the American West and regularly visited the Arizona home of his fellow surrealists-in-exile, Max Ernst and Dorothea Tanning. The awesome scale of the red rocks, the brilliance of the blinding sun, and the drama of Ernst's giant cement and metal sculptures inspired Tanguy. The environment of the Southwest and the reality of machine-age America are reflected in the mechanical, angular, metallic forms characteristic of his work during this period. In 1953 he visited Europe for the first time since his 1939 departure. He held exhibitions in Rome at the Galleria de l'Obelisco, in Milan at the Puis del Naviglio, and in Paris at the Galerie Renou & Poyet. Before returning to America he visited his sister and his beloved Brittany coasts.

Yves Tanguy and Kay Sage

In 1954 the Wadsworth Atheneum in Connecticut held a joint exhibition of Tanguy and Sage's work. Despite their interconnected working practices they craved artistic independence and insisted that their work be shown in separate galleries. Tanguy offered few insights into his process, declining to discuss his ideology and technical methods. He characterized himself as "very much alone in my work, I am almost jealous of it." Friends such as Breton and Hans Richter characterized Tanguy as a loner toward the end of his life, but he still enjoyed Surrealist games. Shortly before his death, he starred in Richter's art movie 8x8. Part Lewis Carrol, part Freud, the film uses chess (where pieces can become other pieces) as a metaphor for transformation. Duchamp played the White King, Jaqueline Matisse the White Queen, and Tanguy the Black Knight. Tanguy died suddenly on 15 January 1955 after suffering a cerebral haemorrhage. The months leading up to his death, however, were especially prolific. His robust final canvases are often seen as the culmination of his life's obsessions, elevating his fantastic projections to a new level, and gathering the subjects, objects, colors and themes of his life into powerful statements, such as Multiplication of the Arcs (1954) and Imaginary Numbers (1954). His ashes were scattered in Brittany. In September 1955, the first major retrospective of Tanguy's work was held at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.


Legacy

In its entirety, Tanguy's career forms a bridge between Surrealism and Abstract Expressionism. Tanguy's early works anticipated much of later Surrealism - perhaps most visibly in the compositions of Salvador Dalí. His pioneering work with automatism (unconscious painting) was also admired by Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko and other American artists who shared his fascination with the unconscious, and emulated the gestural freedom of his atmospheric backgrounds. Julien Levy noted that: "space for Dalí became terrible, for Tanguy it became both intimate and eternal, consoling and inevitable". However, Dalí once told Tanguy's niece Agnes: "I pinched everything from your Uncle Yves." His influence has been noted in sculptures of Hans Arp, David Hare, and Isamu Noguchi as well as the work of Roberto Matta, Wolfgang Paalen, and Esteban Francés. In 1963 Pierre Matisse and Kay Sage published Yves Tanguy, A Summary of His Work before commencing the Yves Tanguy Catalogue Raisonné.

Influences and Connections

Influences on artist

Artists, Friends, Movements

Influenced by artist

Artists, Friends, Movements

Yves Tanguy
Interactive chart with Yves Tanguy's main influences, and the people and ideas that the artist influenced in turn.
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View Influences Chart

Artists

Hieronymus Bosch
Giorgio de Chirico
Hans Arp

Friends

André Breton
Max Ernst
Joan Miró

Movements

Dada
Surrealism
Precisionism
Yves Tanguy
Yves Tanguy
Years Worked: 1923-1955

Artists

Salvador Dalí
Roberto Matta
Jackson Pollock

Friends

Paul Eluard
Peggy Guggenheim

Movements

Surrealism
Abstract Expressionism
Color Field Painting

Useful Resources on Yves Tanguy

Books
Websites
Articles
Videos
The books and articles below constitute a bibliography of the sources used in the writing this page. These also suggest some accessible resources for further research, especially ones that can be found and purchased via the internet.
biography
Yves Tanguy and Surrealism: Susan Davidson (2001)

By Susan Davidson, Gordon Onslow Ford, Konrad Klapheck, Beate Wolf, Yves Tanguy

Yves Tanguy: Andre Breton (1946)

By Yves Tanguy

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Cite this page

Content compiled and written by The Art Story Contributors

Edited and revised by Ruth Epstein

" Artist Overview and Analysis". [Internet]. . TheArtStory.org
Content compiled and written by The Art Story Contributors
Edited and revised by Ruth Epstein
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André Breton
André Breton
André Breton
André Breton, author of the 1924 Surrealist Manifesto, was an influential theorizer of both Dada and Surrealism. Born in France, he emigrated to New York during World War II, where he greatly influenced the Abstract Expressionists.
TheArtStory: André Breton
Salvador Dalí
Salvador Dalí
Salvador Dalí
Salvador Dalí was a Spanish Surrealist painter who combined a hyperrealist style with dream-like, sexualized subject matter. His collaborations with Hollywood and commercial ventures, alongside his notoriously dramatic personality, earned him scorn from some Surrealist colleagues.
TheArtStory: Salvador Dalí
Mark Rothko
Mark Rothko
Mark Rothko
Mark Rothko was an Abstract Expressionist painter whose early interest in mythic landscapes gave way to mature works featuring large, hovering blocks of color on colored grounds.
TheArtStory: Mark Rothko
Carl Jung
Carl Jung
Carl Jung
Carl Gustav Jung was a Swiss psychiatrist and the founder of analytical psychology. Jung studied the human psyche through an exploration of dreams, religion, mythology and art. Jung's extensive work and interest in the human unconscious was a major influence on some of the Abstract Expressionists.
Carl Jung
Henri Matisse
Henri Matisse
Henri Matisse
Henri Matisse was a French painter and sculptor who helped forge modern art. From his early Fauvist works to his late cutouts, he emphasized expansive fields of color, the expressive potential of gesture, and the sensuality inherent in art-making.
TheArtStory: Henri Matisse
Giorgio de Chirico
Giorgio de Chirico
Giorgio de Chirico
Giorgio de Chirico was a Greek-Italian painter and sculptor commonly associated with Surrealism. Initially discovered by Picasso and Apollinaire in France, de Chirico's best known Surrealist paintings incorporated metaphysical subject matter and sculptural still-life. Instead of land- or cityscapes, de Chirico's art is more emblematic of a dreamscape.
TheArtStory: Giorgio de Chirico
Louis Aragon
Louis Aragon
Louis Aragon
Louis Aragon was a French poet and writer, as well as journalist and editor for several revolutionary and avant-garde journals. He was involved with the Dada circle in Paris before helping found Surrealism in 1924.
Louis Aragon
Paul Eluard
Paul Eluard
Paul Eluard
Paul Eluard was a French poet, and one of the original participants in the French Surrealism movement, forming strong ties with the likes of Breton, Aragon and Ernst. Eluard was also active in the French Resistance during World War II, but later in life joined the Communist Party, became a Stalin sympathizer and renounced the Surrealism movement.
Paul Eluard
Peggy Guggenheim
Peggy Guggenheim
Peggy Guggenheim
Peggy Guggenheim, the neice of Solomon R. Guggenheim, was a collector, patron, and eclectic personality deeply connected to modern art. She gave important exhibitions to many Surrealist and Abstract Expressionist artists at her Art of This Century gallery in New York in the 1940s.
TheArtStory: Peggy Guggenheim
Dorothea Tanning
Dorothea Tanning
Dorothea Tanning
Dorothea Tanning is an American painter whose work is commonly associated with the Surrealists. Heavily influenced by the likes of Duchamp, Ray, Tanguy and perhaps most of all Max Ernst, her former husband, Tanning created a number of paintings in the 1940s that are now considered seminal to the Surrealist movement, including her dream-like self-portrait Birthday. Later in life much of Tanning's work adopted increasingly abstract forms, yet always maintained a distinctly Surrealist aesthetic.
Dorothea Tanning
Hans Richter
Hans Richter
Hans Richter
Hans Richter was a German-born American painter, graphic artist and experimental most importantly, filmmaker. Associated with the German Expressionist group The Blue Rider, and later with the Dada movement and De Stijl, Richter's life work is renowned for spanning much of the twentieth-century modern canon.
TheArtStory: Hans Richter
Surrealism
Surrealism
Surrealism
Perhaps the most influential avant-garde movement of the century, Surrealism was founded in Paris in 1924 by a small group of writers and artists who sought to channel the unconscious as a means to unlock the power of the imagination. Much influenced by Freud, they believed that the conscious mind repressed the power of the imagination. Influenced also by Marx, they hoped that the psyche had the power to reveal the contradictions in the everyday world and spur on revolution.
TheArtStory: Surrealism
Abstract Expressionism
Abstract Expressionism
Abstract Expressionism
A tendency among New York painters of the late 1940s and '50s, all of whom were committed to an expressive art of profound emotion and universal themes. The movement embraced the gestural abstraction of Willem de Kooning and Jackson Pollock, and the color field painting of Mark Rothko and others. It blended elements of Surrealism and abstract art in an effort to create a new style fitted to the postwar mood of anxiety and trauma.
TheArtStory: Abstract Expressionism
Hieronymus Bosch
Hieronymus Bosch
Hieronymus Bosch
Hieronymus Bosch was a Dutch painter during the Northern Renaissance. He painted absurd imagery involving real and imaginary figures in vast landscapes that demonstrated allegories, narratives and morality lessons. Bosch never signed or dated his work, which makes attribution difficult.
Hieronymus Bosch
Hans Arp
Hans Arp
Hans Arp
Hans Arp (also known as Jean Arp) was a German-French artist who incorporated chance, randomness, and organic forms into his sculptures, paintings, and collages. He was involved with Zurich Dada, Surrealism, and the Abstraction-Creation movement.
TheArtStory: Hans Arp
Max Ernst
Max Ernst
Max Ernst
Max Ernst was a German Dadaist and Surrealist whose paintings and collages combine dream-like realism, automatic techniques, and eerie subject matter.
TheArtStory: Max Ernst
Joan Miró
Joan Miró
Joan Miró
Active in Paris from the 1920s onward, and influenced by Surrealism, Miró developed a style of biomorphic abstraction which blended abstract figurative motifs, large fields of color, and primitivist symbols. This style would be an important inspiration for many Abstract Expressionists.
TheArtStory: Joan Miró
Dada
Dada
Dada
Dada was an artistic and literary movement that emerged in 1916. It arose in reaction to World War I, and the nationalism and rationalism that many thought had led to the War. Influenced by several avant-gardes - Cubism, Futurism, Constructivism, and Expressionism - its output was wildly diverse, ranging from performance art to poetry, photography, sculpture, painting and collage. Emerging first in Zurich, it spread to cities including Berlin, Hanover, Paris, New York and Cologne.
TheArtStory: Dada
Precisionism
Precisionism
Precisionism
Precisionism was an American art movement in the first half of the nineteenth century. Influenced by the planar divisions in Cubism, artists like Stuart Davis and Charles Demuth used precise lines and abstracted planes to depict vernacular architecture and the industrial landscape.
Precisionism
Roberto Matta
Roberto Matta
Roberto Matta
Roberto Matta was a Chilean-born artist who lived and worked in New York in the 1940s. His interest in automatism and painterly effects helped forge a crucial link between Surrealism and Abstract Expressionism.
TheArtStory: Roberto Matta
Jackson Pollock
Jackson Pollock
Jackson Pollock
Jackson Pollock was the most well-known Abstract Expressionist and the key example of Action Painting. His work ranges from Jungian scenes of primitive rites to the purely abstract "drip paintings" of his later career.
TheArtStory: Jackson Pollock
Color Field Painting
Color Field Painting
Color Field Painting
A tendency within Abstract Expressionism, distinct from gestural abstraction, Color Field painting was developed by Barnett Newman, Mark Rothko, and Clyfford Still in the late 1940s, and developed further by Helen Frankenthaler and others. It is characterized by large fields of color and an absence of any figurative motifs, and often expresses a yearning for transcendence and the infinite.
TheArtStory: Color Field Painting
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