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Artists Dorothea Lange

Dorothea Lange

American Photographer

Movements: Modern Photography, Documentary Photography

Born: May 26, 1895 - Hoboken, New Jersey

Died: October 11, 1965 - San Francisco, California

Quotes

"The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."
Dorothea Lange
"Bring the viewer to your side, include him in your thought. He is not a bystander. You have the power to increase his perceptions and conceptions."
Dorothea Lange
"I feel myself more like a cipher, a person that can be used for lots of things and I like that. But I don't feel that I personally stand for anything so great, you know. That is the way in which I kind of slid into this. You asked me about deciding to be a photographer, but over everything, I think, all my decisions right along, even working in the field when I was doing documentary work, have been instinctive; and I trust my instincts. I don't distrust them. They haven't led me astray. It's when I've made up my mind to be efficient that is when I have gone wrong."
Dorothea Lange

"Bring the viewer to your side, include him in your thought. He is not a bystander. You have the power to increase his perceptions and conceptions."

Synopsis

Dorothea Lange's images of Depression-era America made her one of the most acclaimed documentary photographers of the twentieth century. She is remembered above all for revealing the plight of sharecroppers, displaced farmers and migrant workers in the 1930s, and her portrait of Florence Owens Thompson, Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California(1936), has become an icon of the period. Since much of this work was carried out for a government body, the Farm Security Administration, it has been an unusual test case of American art being commissioned explicitly to drive government policy. After the Depression she went on to enjoy an illustrious career in photo-journalism during its hey-day, working for leading magazines such as Fortune and Life, and traveling widely throughout Asia, Latin America, and Egypt. She was instrumental in assembling the "Family of Man" exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1959, a renowned celebration of struggling post-war humanity.

Key Ideas

Many of Lange's documentary photographs borrow techniques from the lexicon of modernism - dramatic angles and dynamic compositions - to produce startling and often jarring images of her subjects. They never overpower the subjects themselves, but instead subtly direct the viewer to a fresh appreciation of the individual's plight.
Lange's mature work proved that works of art and documents are not mutually exclusive, and that they can combine to produce beautiful, moving, and campaigning images. Her use of innovative techniques also proved that modernist art need not only convey the private feelings of the artist, but could also be put in the services of popular journalism.
Lange's work, not only in the Depression but also in the post-war years, is characteristic of a lost age when a broad swath of the mass media was profoundly concerned with social issues. She saw herself firstly as a journalist and secondly as an artist, and she worked with a burning desire to effect social change by informing the public of suffering far away.

Most Important Art

The White Angel Breadline (1933)
One of Lange's better-known photographs, she often cited this particular scene when speaking about her breakthrough into documentary photography. "The discrepancy between what I was working on in the printing frames and what was going on in the streets was more than I could assimilate". Drawn to the lines of people waiting for worker's compensation or food relief, the image of this elderly man waiting for food at the soup kitchen embodies the depressed mood of the times. The camera focuses on the man's hat and face, which show an exploration of texture through comparison of the rough material and wrinkles of the hat, as well as his weathered skin; her unconventional use of the fence in the foreground to lend dynamism to the scene is also characteristic of use of modernist techniques.
- San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Henry Swift Collection
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Biography

Childhood

Dorothea Lange grew up in a middle class family in New Jersey. Her father, Heinrich Nutzhorn, worked as a lawyer, but also held several respected positions in local businesses, politics and the church, while her mother Johanna managed the household. Both parents were proponents of education and culture, and exposed both Dorothea and her brother Martin to literature and the creative arts.

At the age of seven, Dorothea contracted polio, which left her with a weakened right leg and foot. Always conscious of its effects, she once said that, "[polio] was the most important thing that happened to me, and formed me, guided me, instructed me, helped me, and humiliated me". Her parents divorced five years later; Dorothea never forgave her father, whom she blamed for ending the marriage. She eventually dropped his surname, instead taking her mother's maiden name for her own.

Without Heinrich, the family moved in with Johanna's mother, Sophie, a seamstress with an artistic touch. Although this arrangement was not ideal for Dorothea, who had a mutually antagonistic relationship with her grandmother, Sophie's love of "fine things" and artistic sensibility left its mark on the young girl.

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Early Training

Lange showed little interest in academics, and after high school announced to her family that she intended to pursue photography. Looking for work, she approached Arnold Genthe, one of the most successful portrait photographers in the nation. He hired her as a receptionist, but taught her skills of the trade, including how to make proofs, retouch photographs, and mount pictures. Although she worked for several different photographers after Genthe, she always remembered his sense of aesthetics and the importance he placed on high quality, not unlike the lessons her grandmother taught her.

Lange also took a photography course with Clarence White, a contemporary of Alfred Stieglitz. White was influenced by the Pictorialist style of photography, which cultivated many of the effects of fine painting, but he also encouraged his students to individualize their pictures by developing a unique point of view, and his assignments often involved photographing everyday subjects to truly see them. Lange used this concept later in life, where photographs reveal the extraordinary within the average working American.

Lange settled in San Francisco in 1918. Through friends, she made connections with wealthy business owners and gallery patrons, and was soon able to open her own successful portrait studio. Lange considered her work a trade rather than an art, and primarily sought to satisfy her client's desires. She married Maynard Dixon, a well-known muralist, with whom she had two sons, and her marriage drew her deeper into the California art community, but the Great Depression proved a strain on both her marriage and career. Seeing the effects of financial hardship on the people around her, she grew increasingly dissatisfied with portrait work. She took to the streets of San Francisco - documented and sought new techniques, experimenting with close-up shots and simple compositions that emphasized shape and form, rather than focusing only on the subject.

Mature Period

Dorothea Lange Biography

In 1935, Lange was one of the photographers asked to assist with an economic research study led by Paul Taylor, who later became her second husband. Impressed by her work, Taylor recruited her for the Farm Security Administration (FSA), a division of the U. S. government that represented the interests of American farm workers, including tenant farmers and people of color. During this time, Lange recorded the conditions of workers living in poverty-stricken areas of the West coast, the South and the Midwest, including the camps that resulted from the Dust Bowl migration. The photographs from her tenure with the FSA have become iconic within American history and photography.

Out in the field, Lange developed her signature style of photography. Abandoning wide-angle landscape views, she reverted to practices used in her studio and asked the workers to share their stories. These mature photographs often represent intimate portraits, and the captions relate information gleaned from her conversations.

Within this body of work, four main themes emerged. Primarily, the photographs emphasize the relationship between the land and the people, clearly illustrated by the growing hopelessness of the workers unable to revitalize their sterile environments. A feeling of desertion also runs through her depictions of empty streets, abandoned houses, and fields bare of crops. Among her portraits, Lange often represented the depressed man, left idle and dispirited from lack of work. Conversely, images of the strong female heroic figure are also prevalent in her photographs.

Lange became the first female photographer to receive a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1940. First postponed due to family obligations, she later requested another deferment when she was asked to document the internment of the Japanese population after the Pearl Harbor attack. The commission came from the government, yet the resulting photographs threatened to be so controversial that they were impounded for the duration of the war and Lange was not able to see them until twenty years later. They create a subtle yet startling picture of the racism practiced by the American government against its own citizens, and many of the photographs are taken in her signature portrait style, lending a sense of dignity to the people who had been forced from their homes. Lange was able to capture the strength and resilience of the Japanese community, which continued to organize cultural activities and published their own newspapers within the camps.

Late Period

Dorothea Lange Photo

Disillusioned with the failure of her work to enact true social or political change, Lange withdrew from photography for several years. Multiple ailments, including lingering effects from her bout with polio, also took their toll on her health. She briefly taught a photography course at the California School of Fine Arts, using methods that echoed White, her old teacher. By 1950, however, she had resumed working and agreed to participate in the Family of Man exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Lange was contracted by Life to photograph the Mormon society in Utah and the Irish community in County Clare, but these articles also failed to communicate her intentions of social change. When Taylor was appointed a foreign diplomat, she gained the opportunity to record life across the continents, many of which proved more destitute than the conditions she experienced during her work with the FSA. These trips ended as her health continued to deteriorate, although she remained energetic enough to collaborate with New York's Museum of Modern Art on her first solo exhibition. Lange passed away from esophageal cancer in October of 1965, less than three months before her retrospective opened.

Legacy

Dorothea Lange is an inspiring example of the opportunities that lay open to strong, independent women photographers in the modern era. Her greatest achievements lie in the photographs she took during the Depression. They made an enormous impact on how millions of ordinary Americans understood the plight of the poor in their country, and they have inspired generations of campaigning photographers ever since. But her work after the 1930s also deserves note, not least her involvement with establishing the Aperture Foundation and magazine. Several awards have been set up in her name, including the Lange-Taylor prize for excellence in documentary studies and the Lange Fellowship for documentary photography. Her archives have been preserved near her hometown at the Oakland Museum of California.

Influences and Connections

Influences on artist

Artists, Friends, Movements

Influenced by artist

Artists, Friends, Movements

Dorothea Lange
Interactive chart with Dorothea Lange's main influences, and the people and ideas that the artist influenced in turn.
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Artists

Horace Bristol
Maynard Dixon
Lewis Hine
Paul Strand
Clarence White

Friends

Imogen Cunningham
Roy Stryker

Movements

Modern Photography
Dorothea Lange
Dorothea Lange
Years Worked: 1930-1964

Artists

Ansel Adams
Horace Bristol
Catherine Opie

Friends

Pare Lorentz
John Steinbeck
Roy Stryker

Movements

Documentary Photography
Photo-journalism

Original content written by The Art Story Contributors

Edited and published by The Art Story Contributors

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Useful Resources on Dorothea Lange

Books
Websites
Articles
Videos
More
The books and articles below constitute a bibliography of the sources used in the writing this page. These also suggest some accessible resources for further research, especially ones that can be found and purchased via the internet.
biography
Dorothea Lange: A Life Beyond Limits

By Linda Gordon

Restless Spirit: The Life and Work of Dorothea Lange

By Elizabeth Partridge

Dorothea Lange: A Photographer's Life

By Milton Meltzer, Dorthea Lange

A Friendship of Differences

By William Meyers
The Wall Street Journal
April 29, 2010

Seeing Dignity in Poverty

By Julia Baird
Newsweek
November 5, 2009

Internment Without Charges: Dorothea Lange and the Censored Images of Japanese American Internment

By Linda Gordon
Japan Focus
December 4, 2006

Viewfinders Keepers

By Steve Chawkin
Los Angeles Times
May 31, 2004

interviews
Oral history interview with Dorothea Lange

Conducted by Richard K. Doud
May 22, 1964

Clarence White
Clarence White
Clarence White
Clarence White was an American photographer and a founding member of the Photo-Secession movement. He is known for his sentimental, pictorial portraits and for his excellence as a photography teacher. He founded the Clarence H. White School of Photography.
Clarence White
Alfred Stieglitz
Alfred Stieglitz
Alfred Stieglitz
Alfred Stieglitz was an American photographer who published the pioneering journal Camera Work. His gallery 291 was a locus for modern artists in America.
ArtStory: Alfred Stieglitz
Modern Photography
Modern Photography
Modern Photography
Modern photography refers to a range of different approaches. Some, associated with 'Straight Photography,' celebrate clarity and documentary truthfulness. Others, associated with 'New Vision' photography, are often characterized by unusual perspectives, novel print techniques, and abstraction.
Modern Photography
Documentary Photography
Documentary Photography
Documentary Photography
Documentary photography attempts to portray the social realities of its subjects' lives. Many early twentieth-century photographers worked in this vein, capturing their subjects unawares or amidst their daily routines; famous examples include August Sander, Jacob Riis, and Walker Evans.
Documentary Photography
Horace Bristol
Horace Bristol
Horace Bristol
Horace Bristol was a twentieth century American photographer, best known for his work in Life magazine. In 1938, Bristol began to document migrant farmers in California's central valley with John Steinbeck, recording the Great Depression.
Horace Bristol
Maynard Dixon
Maynard Dixon
Maynard Dixon
Maynard Dixon was a twentieth-century American artist, whose body of work focused on the American West. He was married for a time to Dorothea Lange. During the Great Depression, Dixon painted a series of canvases depicting maritime strikes, displaced workers, and those affected by the Depression.
Maynard Dixon
Lewis Hine
Lewis Hine
Lewis Hine
Lewis Hine was an American sociologist and photographer. Hine used his camera as a tool for social reform. His photographs were instrumental in changing the child labor laws in the United States.
Lewis Hine
Paul Strand
Paul Strand
Paul Strand
Paul Strand was an American photographer whose portraits, city scenes, and abstract compositions helped define modernist photography in the twentieth century. A friend of photographer Alfred Stieglitz, he was regularly featured in Stieglitz's journal Camera Work and his 291 Gallery.
Paul Strand
Imogen Cunningham
Imogen Cunningham
Imogen Cunningham
Born in Portland, Oregon in 1883, Imogen Cunningham was an American photographer best known for her photographs of botanicals, nudes and industry. In 1932, Cunningham became one of the co-founders of the Group f/64 with Ansel Adams.
Imogen Cunningham
Roy Stryker
Roy Stryker
Roy Stryker
Roy Stryker was an American economist, government official, and photographer. He is most famous for heading the Information Division of the Farm Security Administration (FSA) during the Great Depression and launching the documentary photography movement of the FSA.
Roy Stryker
Ansel Adams
Ansel Adams
Ansel Adams
Ansel Adams was an American photographer best known for his mid-twentieth-century black-and-white portraits of the Western frontier. His signature style was characterized by a sharp, high-resolution focus and stark contrasts of light and shadow. Adams co-founded Group f/64, a collective of Western-American photographers.
Ansel Adams
Catherine Opie
Catherine Opie
Catherine Opie
Catherine Opie is an American artist specializing in issues within documentary photography. Throughout her work she has investigated aspects of community, making portraits of many groups, including the LGBT community.
Catherine Opie
Pare Lorentz
Pare Lorentz
Pare Lorentz
Pare Lorentz was an American filmmaker. In 1936, after working as a critic in Hollywood, he was asked by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt to make a film about the Oklahoma Dust Bowl. Lorentz was appointed to the Resettlement Administration as a film consultant.
Pare Lorentz
John Steinbeck
John Steinbeck
John Steinbeck
John Steinbeck was an American writer. He wrote the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Grapes of Wrath and East of Eden and the novella Of Mice and Men. In 1962, Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize for Literature.
John Steinbeck
Photo-journalism
Photo-journalism
Photo-journalism
Photo-journalism is a particular form of journalism - the collecting, editing, and presenting of news material for publication or broadcast - that creates images in order to tell a news story.
Photo-journalism