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Artists Jasper Johns

Jasper Johns

American Painter and Printmaker

Movement: Neo-Dada

Born: May 15, 1930 - Augusta, Georgia

Quotes

"I tend to like things that already exist."
Jasper Johns
"I feel that works of art are an opportunity for people to construct meaning, so I don't usually tell what they mean. It conveys to people that they have to participate."
Jasper Johns
"Early on I was very involved with the notion of the painting as an object and tended to attack that idea from different directions."
Jasper Johns
"In my early work, I tried to hide my personality, my psychological state, my emotions. This was partly due to my feelings about myself and partly due to my feelings about painting at the time. I sort of stuck to my guns for a while but eventually it seemed like a losing battle. Finally one must simply drop the reserve."
Jasper Johns

"I think a painting should include more experience than simply intended statement."

Synopsis

The reverberations of the work of Jasper Johns affected nearly every artistic movement from the 1950s through the present day. Johns engaged with modernist precedents like the original Dada movement and Abstract Expressionism in order to actively refute the hierarchy of modernism that reduced the aesthetic experience to the distinct material qualities of the medium and removed it from the viewer's life. He did so by initiating a dialogue with the viewer and their cultural context through his artistic exploration of how people see the things around them. By representing common objects and images in the realm of fine art, Johns broke down the boundaries traditionally separating fine art and everyday life. He effectively laid the foundation for the Pop Art movement's aesthetic embrace of commodity culture with his playfully subversive appropriation of common signs and products. Johns' exploration of semiotics and perception also set the stage for both the Conceptual art movement and the Postmodern movement of the following decades, while his multimedia collaborations with John Cage, Robert Rauschenberg, and Merce Cunningham ushered in the dominance of the performance art movement in the 1960s and 1970s.

Key Ideas

Rather than direct representation or abstraction, Johns made signs, like flags and targets, the main images in his works. The "things the mind already knows" were his ideal subject because of the host of varied meanings each carried with it. This fostered the perceptual ambiguity and semiotic play at the heart of his works.
Johns quoted the gesturally evocative Abstract Expressionist brushstroke, using the idea of the artist's mark as merely another symbol that enhanced the multiplicity of meanings and interpretations in his paintings.
Like his Dada predecessor and mentor, Marcel Duchamp, Johns artistically initiated a dialogue in each artwork that was meant to be resolved within the mind of the viewer. His expansion of this ideal throughout his oeuvre ushered the open-ended aesthetic typically associated with movements at the start of Postmodernism, like Conceptual art.
Through his use of shreds of newspaper, found objects, and even mass-produced goods like Ballantine Ale and Savarin Coffee cans, Johns erased the division between fine art and mass culture. This shifted modern art away from abstraction towards the consumer landscape of mid-twentieth century America.

Most Important Art

Flag (1954-55)
This, Johns' first major work, broke from the Abstract Expressionist precedent of non-objective painting with his representation of a recognizable everyday object - the American flag. Johns built the flag from a dynamic surface made up of shreds of newspaper dipped in encaustic - with snippets of text still visible through the wax - rather than oil paint applied to the canvas with a brush. As the molten, pigmented wax cooled, it fixed the scraps of newspaper in visually distinct marks that evoked the gestural brushwork of the Abstract Expressionists of the previous decade. The frozen encaustic embodied Johns' interest in semiotics by quoting the "brushstroke" of the action painters as a symbol for artistic expression, rather than a direct mode of expression, as part of his career-long investigation into "how we see and why we see the way we do."

The symbol of the American flag, to this day, carries a host of connotations and meanings that shift from individual to individual, making it the ideal subject for Johns' initial foray into visually exploring the "things the mind already knows." He intentionally blurred the lines between high art and everyday life with his choice of seemingly mundane subject matter. Johns painted Flag in the context of the McCarthy witch-hunts in Cold War America. Then and now, some viewers will read national pride or freedom in the image, while others only see imperialism or oppression. Johns was one of the first artists to present viewers with the dichotomies embedded in the American flag. Johns referred to his paintings as "facts" and did not provide predetermined interpretations of his work; when critics asked Johns if the work was a painted flag, or a flag painting, he said it was both. As with other Neo-Dada works, the meaning of the artwork is determined by the viewer, not the artist.
Encaustic, oil, and collage on fabric mounted on plywood - The Museum of Modern Art, New York
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Biography

Childhood

Born in 1930 in Augusta, Georgia, Jasper Johns grew up in rural South Carolina and lived with his paternal grandparents after his parents divorced when he was only a toddler. The paintings of his deceased grandmother, hung in his grandfather's house where he lived until the age of nine, provided his only exposure to art in his childhood. Johns began drawing at a very young age, with a vague intention of wanting to become an artist, but only pursued an official art education in college. He described his childhood desire to become an artist, stating, "I really didn't know what that meant. I think I thought it meant that I would be in a situation different than the one that I was in." Johns moved in with his Aunt Gladys for a few years in his adolescence during which she taught him, and two other students, in a one-room schoolhouse. Eventually Johns reunited with his re-married mother, and graduated as the valedictorian of his class at his high school in Sumter, South Carolina.

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Early Training

Jasper Johns Biography

After high school, Johns spent three semesters at the University of South Carolina, starting in 1947. Urged by his teachers to study in New York, he moved north and spent one semester at the Parsons School of Design in 1948. However, Parsons was not the ideal fit for Johns, and he left the school, rendering him eligible for the draft. In 1951, he was drafted into the army and spent two years in service during the Korean War at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, and in Sendai, Japan. Upon returning to New York after an honorable discharge from the army in 1953, Johns met Robert Rauschenberg, who ushered him into the art scene there. The two artists shared an intense relationship, both romantic and artistic, from 1954 to 1961. Johns noted that he "learned what an artist was from watching [Rauschenberg]." The two artists eventually lived together, had neighboring studio spaces, and formed "the main audience for each other's work." Through their constant contact, they deeply influenced each other's artwork, exchanging ideas and techniques that broke from Abstract Expressionism. Rauschenberg introduced Johns to composer John Cage and choreographer Merce Cunningham, as well as to the work of European Dadaist Marcel Duchamp. In 1958, Johns and Rauschenberg traveled to see the collection of Duchamp's work at the Philadelphia Museum, where the elder Dada artist's readymades had a profound impact on both young artists. In 1959, Duchamp himself visited Johns' studio, forming a direct connection between the European avant-garde and the newest generation of American modernists. Through these introductions, Johns' artistic practice expanded as he incorporated the methods of each into his own work.

Mature Period

Although he had only exhibited his painting Green Target (1955) in a group show at the Jewish Museum in 1957, Johns received his first solo exhibition in 1958, after Rauschenberg introduced him to influential gallery owner Leo Castelli. The solo show featured Johns' groundbreaking painting Flag (1955), as well as other previously unseen works from the 1950s. The idea for Flag came to Johns one night in 1955, when he dreamt about painting a large American flag. He brought the dream to life the following day, and eventually he completed several paintings of variations on the theme, all of which were included in the Castelli Gallery show. The paintings all dealt with semiotic images, or symbols and signs, in a simple and straightforward manner and stood in strict opposition to the abstractions of earlier avant-gardes. The landmark solo exhibition received monumentally positive critical attention and catapulted Johns into the public eye. Alfred Barr, the director of the Museum of Modern Art, bought three paintings, which was essentially unheard of for a young, unknown artist.

As the Pop art movement grew around him, Johns left behind the colorful paintings filled with familiar gestures and images and turned to a darker palette. Some critics attribute the shift away from color and toward the grays, blacks, and whites that dominate many of his canvases from the early 1960s to the rocky end of his relationship with Rauschenberg. Although they did not move out of their New York studio spaces until 1961, their relationship was already strained by 1959. That year Rauschenberg acquired a studio space in Florida, and two years later, Johns took a studio on Edisto Island in South Carolina. Although they still spent some time together in New York, both increasingly went their own separate ways.

The end of such an influential and formative relationship had a huge emotional impact on Johns, and he immersed himself in his work as well as the linguistic philosophic works of Ludwig Wittgenstein and the poetry of Hart Crane. In 1963, he noted he "had the sense of arriving at a point where there was no place to stand." However, he continued to expand the fragmented focus and ambiguous meanings of his works. While he was involved with the Merce Cunningham Dance Company throughout the 1960s, he served as the artistic director from 1967 through 1980. In 1968, Johns designed the set decor for Walkaround Time after one of his most admired artworks, Duchamp's The Large Glass (The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even) (1915-23). Starting in 1960, he began a long-lasting working relationship with Tatyana Grosman at Universal Limited Art Editions (ULAE), where he created over 120 prints over the decade. Many of his prints echoed the subjects of his paintings, while others expanded his visual repertoire, but all formed a critical dialogue with the rest of his oeuvre. During the 1960s, he also began to further integrate physical, sculptural elements into his paintings, a practice inherited from Duchamp and Rauschenberg.

Late Period

Jasper Johns Photo

After his Edisto Island studio burned down in 1968, Johns split his time between New York City, St. Martin, and Stony Point, New York; he bought studios at the latter two in the early 1970s. During this period, Johns introduced the use of the motif of crosshatching, or line clusters, into his repertoire, and this style dominated his output through the early 1980s. Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, Johns' work took a more introspective turn as he included specifically autobiographical, introspective content in his work. Although, as Johns pointed out, "There is a period in which I began to use images from my life, but everything you use is from your life."

Johns became increasingly more reclusive in the decades after his break from Rauschenberg, almost never giving interviews, and maintaining a very quiet public persona. However, he continued to have close contact with a select few of the art world's insiders; Philip Johnson designed the entertainment center that frames Johns' "latest greatest" wall in his St. Martin Studio, while the former Senior Consultant for Modern and Contemporary Art at the Metropolitan Museum, Nan Rosenthal, and her husband, lawyer Henry Cortesi, helped Johns name his Catenary series (1999) when the couple visited Johns in that same tropical studio in the late 1990s. He created his most recent series of prints with Universal Limited Art Editions (ULAE) in 2011, still experimenting with many recurring motifs in varying mediums.

Johns made headlines again in August 2013, after his studio assistant from 1988 until 2012, James Meyer, was charged with the theft of six and a half million dollars worth of art from a folder of works that Johns had prohibited from being sold. Meyer was in charge of that folder and absconded with the 22 works from Johns' studio in Sharon, Connecticut, to sell them through an unidentified gallery in New York, after claiming they were gifts from Johns. Johns did not comment on the theft, but he did fire Meyer shortly after discovering the missing works. Johns currently shares his time between his studios in Sharon, Connecticut, where he moved in the 1990s, and St. Martin, and is presently represented by the Matthew Marks Gallery in New York.

Legacy

Jasper Johns Portrait

As part of the crucial Neo-Dada movement, Johns bridged the aesthetic gap between Abstract Expressionism and Pop art during the late 1950s, but to this day, he continues to expand his subjects, materials, and styles. Pop artists, like Andy Warhol and James Rosenquist, benefitted from Johns' groundbreaking turn to the outside world, which presented everyday objects and mass-produced goods as the subject matter of fine art. Through his exploration of the mutable meanings of images and symbols, Johns also paved the way for the Conceptual art movement of the 1960s. In his collaborations with performance artists like Merce Cunningham and Allan Kaprow, Johns' expanded artistic practice helped usher in movements and groups like Fluxus, body art, and the general performance art movement of the 1970s. While Pop artists directly inherited Johns' representation of the outside world, Postmodernism's aesthetic of bricolage is heir to his interest in appropriation, the multiplicity of meanings, and semiotic play. Ultimately, Johns and his Neo-Dada contemporaries shifted the focus of the American avant-garde, heralding the experimentation and viewer interaction that would come to dominate the art of the decades following his explosive arrival on the New York art scene in 1958.

Influences and Connections

Influences on artist

Artists, Friends, Movements

Influenced by artist

Artists, Friends, Movements

Jasper Johns
Interactive chart with Jasper Johns's main influences, and the people and ideas that the artist influenced in turn.
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Artists

Marcel Duchamp
Pablo Picasso
Willem de Kooning
Arshile Gorky

Friends

Robert Rauschenberg
John Cage
Merce Cunningham

Movements

Abstract Expressionism
Dada
Jasper Johns
Jasper Johns
Years Worked: 1954 - present

Artists

Andy Warhol
Ed Ruscha
Claes Oldenburg
Frank Stella
Roy Lichtenstein

Friends

Robert Rauschenberg
John Cage
Merce Cunningham
Philip Johnson
Leo Castelli

Movements

Neo-Dada
Pop Art
Minimalism
Conceptual Art

Original content written by Rachel Gershman

Edited and published by The Art Story Contributors

. [Internet]. . TheArtStory.org website. Available from:
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Useful Resources on Jasper Johns

Books
Websites
Articles
Audio
Videos
More
The books and articles below constitute a bibliography of the sources used in the writing this page. These also suggest some accessible resources for further research, especially ones that can be found and purchased via the internet.
biography
Jasper Johns

By Michael Crichton

written by artist
Jasper Johns: Writings, Sketchbook Notes, Interviews

By Christel Hollevoet, Robert Frank, Jasper Johns, and Kirk Varnedoe

The Gray Areas of Jasper Johns

By Carol Vogel
The New York Times
February 3, 2008

The Mind's Eye

By Calvin Tomkins
The New Yorker
December 11, 2006

The Unflagging Artistry of Jasper Johns

By Deborah Solomon
The New York Times
June 19, 1988

WNYC - The Leonard Lopate Show

Discussion of the exhibition "Jasper Johns: Gray" at the Metropolitan Museum of Art
April 25, 2008

transcripts
Vanity Fair

Questionnaire interview with Jasper Johns
December 2007

The Brooklyn Rail

Interview with Jasper Johns by John Yau
February 2, 2007

Smithsonian Archives of American Art

Transcript of oral history interview by Paul Cummings with Leo Castelli, the gallery owner who gave Johns his first show. He describes meeting Johns and his early work.
May 1969

Dada
Dada
Dada
Dada was an artistic and literary movement that emerged in 1916. It arose in reaction to World War I, and the nationalism and rationalism that many thought had led to the War. Influenced by several avant-gardes - Cubism, Futurism, Constructivism, and Expressionism - its output was wildly diverse, ranging from performance art to poetry, photography, sculpture, painting and collage. Emerging first in Zurich, it spread to cities including Berlin, Hanover, Paris, New York and Cologne.
ArtStory: Dada
Abstract Expressionism
Abstract Expressionism
Abstract Expressionism
A tendency among New York painters of the late 1940s and '50s, all of whom were committed to an expressive art of profound emotion and universal themes. The movement embraced the gestural abstraction of Willem de Kooning and Jackson Pollock, and the color field painting of Mark Rothko and others. It blended elements of Surrealism and abstract art in an effort to create a new style fitted to the postwar mood of anxiety and trauma.
ArtStory: Abstract Expressionism
Pop Art
Pop Art
Pop Art
British artists of the 1950s were the first to make popular culture the dominant subject of their art, and this idea became an international phenomenon in the 1960s. But the Pop art movement is most associated with New York, and artists such as Andy Warhol, who broke with the private concerns of the Abstract Expressionists, and turned to themes which touched on public life and mass society.
ArtStory: Pop Art
Conceptual Art
Conceptual Art
Conceptual Art
Conceptual art describes an influential movement that first emerged in the mid-1960s and prized ideas over the formal or visual components of traditional works of art. The artists often challenged old concepts such as beauty and quality; they also questioned the conventional means by which the public consumed art; and they rejected the conventional art object in favor of diverse mediums, ranging from maps and diagrams to texts and videos.
ArtStory: Conceptual Art
Postmodern Art
Postmodern Art
Postmodern Art
Postmodern art is a general term applied to artistic genres that are believed to have followed modern art forms of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Mired heavily in critical theory and academia, postmodern art forms include such disciplines as Conceptual art, Installation, Land art, Sound and Video art, and Process art.
ArtStory: Postmodern Art
John Cage
John Cage
John Cage
John Cage was an American composer and conceptual artist who incorporated chance, silence, and environmental effects into his performances. An important art theorist, he influenced choreographers, musicians, and the Fluxus artists of the 1970s.
ArtStory: John Cage
Robert Rauschenberg
Robert Rauschenberg
Robert Rauschenberg
Robert Rauschenberg, a key figure in early Pop art, admired the textural quality of Abstract Expressionism but scorned its emotional pathos. His famous "Combines" are part sculpture, part painting, and part installation.
ArtStory: Robert Rauschenberg
Merce Cunningham
Merce Cunningham
Merce Cunningham
Merce Cunningham was an American choreographer and dance instructor. He taught at Black Mountain College for several years, playing an important role in the school's interdisciplinary approach to art instruction. He founded the Merce Cunningham Dance Company in New York, and is considered one of the founders of modern dance.
Merce Cunningham
Performance Art
Performance Art
Performance Art
Performance is a genre in which art is presented "live," usually by the artist but sometimes with collaborators or performers. It has had a role in avant-garde art throughout the twentieth century, playing an important part in anarchic movements such as Futurism and Dada. It particularly flourished in the 1960s, when Performance artists became preoccupied with the body, but it continues to be an important aspect of art practice.
ArtStory: Performance Art
Marcel Duchamp
Marcel Duchamp
Marcel Duchamp
The French artist Marcel Duchamp was an instrumental figure in the avant-garde art worlds of Paris and New York. Moving through Dada, Surrealism, readymades, sculpture, and installation, his work involves conceptual play and an implicit attack on bourgeois art sensibilities.
ArtStory: Marcel Duchamp
Neo-Dada
Neo-Dada
Neo-Dada
Neo-Dada refers to works of art from the 1950s that employ popular imagery and modern materials, often resulting in something absurd. Neo-Dada is both a continuation of the earlier Dada movement and an important precursor to Pop art. Some important Neo-Dada artists include Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, Robert Morris and Allan Kaprow.
ArtStory: Neo-Dada
Andy Warhol
Andy Warhol
Andy Warhol
Andy Warhol was an American Pop artist best known for his prints and paintings of consumer goods, celebrities, and photographed disasters. One of the most famous and influential artists of the 1960s, he pioneered compositions and techniques that emphasized repetition and the mechanization of art.
ArtStory: Andy Warhol
James Rosenquist
James Rosenquist
James Rosenquist
James Rosenquist is an American Pop artist whose paintings feature fragments of faces, cars, consumer goods, and other items in bizarre juxtapositions. With their realist rendering and attention to surface textures, his works take up the visual language of advertising and entertainment.
James Rosenquist
Allan Kaprow
Allan Kaprow
Allan Kaprow
Allan Kaprow was an American painter, collagist, assemblagist and performance artist. Kaprow was best known for trailblazing the artistic concept "happenings," which were experiential artistic events rather than single works of art.
ArtStory: Allan Kaprow
Fluxus
Fluxus
Fluxus
Fluxus was an international network of "intermedia" artists of the 1960s who worked in fields ranging from music to performance to the visual arts. Taking their name from the Latin "to flow," Fluxus artists adopted an often anarchic and satirical approach to conventional forms of art, and their ideas paved the way for Conceptual art.
ArtStory: Fluxus
Body Art
Body Art
Body Art
Body art is art form that uses the human body as its canvas. Tattoos and body piercings are the most common form of body art. Other types include branding, scarification, body shaping, full body tattoo and body painting. Body art can take a more extreme form in bodily mutilation and acts of physical endurance.
Body Art
Pablo Picasso
Pablo Picasso
Pablo Picasso
Picasso dominated European painting in the first half of the last century, and remains perhaps the century's most important, prolifically inventive, and versatile artist. Alongside Georges Braque, he pioneered Cubism. He also made significant contributions to Surrealist painting and media such as collage, welded sculpture, and ceramics.
ArtStory: Pablo Picasso
Willem de Kooning
Willem de Kooning
Willem de Kooning
Willem de Kooning, a Dutch immigrant to New York, was one of the foremost Abstract Expressionist painters. His abstract compositions drew on Surrealist and figurative traditions, and typified the expressionistic 'gestural' style of the New York School.
ArtStory: Willem de Kooning
Arshile Gorky
Arshile Gorky
Arshile Gorky
Arshile Gorky was an Armenian-born American painter and a major influence on the development of Abstract Expressionism. In his own art he fused elements of Cubism, Surrealism and Expressionism, and was close with key figures central to New York's burgeoning abstrct art scene, such as John Graham, Stuart Davis and Willem de Kooning.
ArtStory: Arshile Gorky
Ed Ruscha
Ed Ruscha
Ed Ruscha
Ed Ruscha is a California-based painter, photographer, and printmaker, recognized as one of the leading figures of Pop art and Conceptualism on the West Coast. From his iconic images of gasoline stations to his 'word paintings,' his work is deeply influenced by the graphic arts and deals largely with themes of commercial culture, language, and the mundane.
Ed Ruscha
Claes Oldenburg
Claes Oldenburg
Claes Oldenburg
The Swedish-American artist and architect Claes Oldenburg, an early figure in New York happenings and Pop art, is best known for his floppy sculptures and larger-than-life public works of consumer goods, musical instruments, and everyday objects.
Claes Oldenburg
Frank Stella
Frank Stella
Frank Stella
Frank Stella is an American artist whose geometric paintings and shaped canvases underscore the idea of the painting as object. A major influence on Minimalism, his iconic works include nested black and white stripes and concentric, angular half-circles in bright colors.
ArtStory: Frank Stella
Roy Lichtenstein
Roy Lichtenstein
Roy Lichtenstein
Roy Lichtenstein was an American painter and a pioneer of the Pop art movement. His signature reproductions of comic book imagery eventually redefined how the art world viewed high vs. lowbrow art. Lichtenstein employed a unique form of painting called the Benday dot technique, in which small, closely-knit dots of paint were applied to form a much larger image.
ArtStory: Roy Lichtenstein
Philip Johnson
Philip Johnson
Philip Johnson
Philip Johnson was an American architect during the twentieth century. Along with Alfred H. Barr, Jr. and Henry-Russel Hitchcock, Johnson helped found the "International Style" of architecture, which stressed functionality over form. Johnson's buildings are considered by some the architectural equivalent of Minimalist art installations, in which the object relies on its surrounding environment for its artistic effect.
Philip Johnson
Leo Castelli
Leo Castelli
Leo Castelli
Leo Castelli was an American art collector and gallery owner. His Castelli Gallery in New York, which opened in 1957, held several groundbreaking shows that revealed to the art world works by artists such as Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns. Castelli's gallery was considered an early proving ground for Neo-Dada, Pop, and Minimalist art.
ArtStory: Leo Castelli
Minimalism
Minimalism
Minimalism
Minimalism emerged as a movement in New York in the 1960s, its leading figures creating objects which blurred the boundaries between painting and sculpture, and were characterized by unitary, geometric forms and industrial materials. Emphasizing cool anonymity over the passionate expression of the previous generation of painters, the Minimalists attempted to avoid metaphorical associations, symbolism, and suggestions of spiritual transcendence.
ArtStory: Minimalism