Hans Hofmann Life and Art Periods

"Color is a plastic means of creating intervals... color harmonics produced by special relationships, or tensions. We differentiate now between formal tensions and color tensions, just as we differentiate in music between counterpoint and harmony."

HANS HOFMANN SYNOPSIS

A pioneering artist and teacher, Hans Hofmann emigrated from Germany to the United States in 1930. He brought with him a deep knowledge of French art, gleaned from years spent in Paris before World War I, and this proved crucial in spreading European modernist styles and ideas in the United States. He taught Lee Krasner, Helen Frankenthaler, and Larry Rivers, and he formed a close relationship with Jackson Pollock. Hofmann's own style represented a fusion of various modes, and his later work made a powerful contribution to Abstract Expressionism.

HANS HOFMANN KEY IDEAS

Hofmann's years in Paris brought him into direct contact with artists such as Georges Braque, Pablo Picasso, Fernand Leger, and Robert Delaunay, and his own style would come to be a fusion of various modes. At various times his work blended Cubist structure with Fauvist color, Expressionist energy, and touches of Surrealism.
Hofmann believed fervently that a modern artist must remain faithful to the flatness of the canvas support. To suggest depth and movement in the picture - to create what he called "push and pull" in the image - artists should create contrasts of color, form, and texture.
Nature was the origin of art, Hofmann believed, and no matter how abstract his pictures seemed to become, he always sought to maintain in them a link to the world of objects. Even when his canvases seemed to be only collections of forms and colors, Hofmann argued that they still contained the suggestion of movement - and movement was the pulse of nature.
Although renowned for his ideas, Hofmann once said that "painters must speak through paint, not through words." And his own foremost medium of expression was color: "The whole world, as we experience it visually," he said, "comes to us through the mystic realm of color."
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HANS HOFMANN BIOGRAPHY

Childhood

Born Johan Georg Albert in Weissenberg, Bavaria in 1880, Hofmann was a precocious child, showing early inclinations towards mathematics, music, science, literature, and art. When he was six years old, his family moved to Munich where his father had secured a job in the government bureaucracy. In time his father would use his position to help find a position for his son working for the Director of Public Works of the State of Bavaria, and it was here that Hofmann began his working life and where he patented several scientific inventions, including a radar device for ships, whilst still in his teenage years.

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Early Training

Hans Hofmann Biography

Hofmann's family hoped that he would develop his promise in science, but by the time he had turned eighteen he had decided to pursue art and enrolled in Moritz Heymann's art school in Munich, where he was introduced to styles such as Impressionism and Pointillism. Soon after, he met a patron who enabled him to support himself as an artist in Paris. Around this time he also met Maria ("Miz") Wolfegg (his 1902 portrait of her represents an early example of the influence of Impressionism on his work). The couple would not marry until 1924, but she accompanied him to Paris in 1904 and they would remain there until 1914. Hofmann was on a visit to Germany when war broke out that year, and he was unable to return to Paris to salvage his pictures, which were all lost.

Mature Period

On return to Munich, Hofmann established his own art school. Its fame soon spread internationally and his first visit to the United States, in 1930, was occasioned by an invitation from a former student, Worth Ryder, to teach a summer session at UC Berkeley. He visited again, and then on his third visit, with political tensions rising in Europe, Hofmann decided to stay and began teaching in New York at the Art Students League. He opened the Hans Hofmann School of Fine Arts in 1933, and two years later opened a summer school in Provincetown, MA.

Hofmann would continue to work as a teacher until 1958, yet his circumstances in the mid-1930s enabled him to find more time for his own painting. He had not had a solo exhibition since his first in Berlin in 1910, but in 1944 he finally had a second, at Peggy Guggenheim's Art of This Century Gallery in New York. Much of the work Hofmann exhibited in that show was conservative in comparison to some of the advanced painting then being created by other artists in Guggenheim's stable; Self-Portrait with Brushes (1942) is typical of his style at this time. Inspired by his surroundings of his home in Provincetown, it was also stylistically eclectic. But it was a success, leading to further significant shows both in Europe and America. Hofmann's contact with other, more Surrealist-influenced artists around Guggenheim's gallery also encouraged his own art to move in that direction; his work gradually became more abstract and infused with mythic and primitive imagery, resulting in pictures such as The Wind (c.1944). At one time historians even speculated on whether Hofmann's experiments with drip painting were the inspiration for Pollock's own more famous use of the method, but most now believe that Hofmann's attempts postdated those. In the early 1950s, Hofmann's pictures became richer in feel, with surfaces built up in layers of thick impasto and rectangular forms floating on areas of saturated color.

Late Period and Death

Hans Hofmann Photo

Hofmann's work as a teacher, his emigration from Europe, and his singular style all contributed to his late recognition as a major painter. Nevertheless, he received many awards and honors in his later life. A retrospective of his work was organized by Clement Greenberg at Bennington College in 1955; another survey was staged at the Whitney Museum in 1957. Along with Philip Guston, Franz Kline, and Theodore Roszac, he represented the United States at the Venice Biennale in 1960. And in 1963, the Museum of Modern Arthosted a retrospective of his work that toured the world.

His success was clouded by the death of his wife Miz in 1963, but two years later Hofmann married again, and he would go on to dedicate a series of paintings to his young German wife, Renate Schmitz, that now hang in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Hofmann died in New York in 1966. He was 86 years old.

HANS HOFMANN LEGACY

Hans Hofmann was the only painter of the New York School that was directly involved in the European modernism of the early twentieth century. In bringing this experience to America, Hofmann's legacy reached far beyond his own work, and it is through his hundreds of students - many of whom went on to achieve success - that his true impact on art history is felt. Clement Greenberg, who was strongly influenced by Hofmann's ideas, claimed he was "in all probability the most important art teacher of our time."

Hofmann's command of English was never strong enough - and he was a generation older than most Abstract Expressionists - to enable him to fit in with the alcoholic socializing of the New York painters. But he was always an intrinsic part of the movement, and it is worth noting also that while many of his contemporaries in the United States were interested in Picasso and Cubism, Hofmann was devoted to Henri Matisse's color, and this undoubtedly influenced many.

WRITINGS AND IDEAS:

Introduction

Hofmann's ideas were built up from his extensive reading in German philosophy, and this established his lifelong habit of thinking in dualities - in thesis, antithesis, and synthesis. He was a particular adherent of the ideas made popular by Adolph von Hildebrand in The Problem of Form in the Visual Arts (1893). He was unwavering in his belief that laws governed the best art, though he often suggested that once an artist had learned and mastered these laws, he was free to break them. Hofmann avoided any suggestion that a modernist artist or critic must distinguish between abstraction and representation, or between gestural, expressionistic styles and geometric forms. He believed that all styles shared a common root in the history of art - different approaches, if executed properly, could achieve the same universal goal, which was the absorption of the artist into the work.

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On Form and Aesthetics

Hans Hofmann Portrait

When Hofmann considered the form of a work of art, he always bore in mind the space on which - and in which - it resided. "Form must be balanced by means of space," Hofmann wrote in 1932, "...form exists because of space and space exists because of form." In any work of art, he looked for a visual unity and form that stimulated interest in the viewer, whether pleasing to the eye or not.

Hofmann once wrote, "[w]e differentiate today between form in a biological sense, which concerns the object, and between form in an [aesthetic] sense, in which the work exists spiritually as a work of art." It was a difference, he explained, rooted in between an object's three-dimensional form and its two-dimensional appearance - but neither was any more "real" than the other. The true artist, Hofmann believed, is one who can merge the physical and the conceptual. "Only Matisse, Picasso, and Braque, each of them in his own way, and a few others have mastered this mammoth problem," he wrote. The ability to unite the physical and the conceptual was an achievement in spiritual unity and an example of what Hofmann considered the magic of art.

On the Magic of Painting

The process of creating a three-dimensional image on a two-dimensional surface was, in Hofmann's eyes, a work of magic; the bare minimum needed to achieve this effect was to draw two lines - one short, one long. Through this process, a sense of three dimensions was created. "Art is magic," he wrote. "But how is it magic? In its metaphysical development? Or does some final transformation culminate in a magic reality? In truth, the latter is impossible without the former. If creation is not magic, the outcome cannot be magic."

In a statement accompanying a solo exhibition at the Kootz Gallery in New York in 1951, Hofmann wrote, "When mutually related, everything makes its mark on another thing. So do colors. They influence each other considerably in a psychological sense, as shapes do. A different color shade gives the same shape another psychological meaning. Difference in plastic or spatial placement (composition) causes any color or shape or color-shape to change completely in psychological expression. This explains the magic of painting."

While social realism had been important in American art of the 1930s and continued to exert an influence, Hofmann believed that "burdening the canvas with propaganda or history does not make the painting a better work of art. Such burdening, in the majority of cases, decreases the quality of the work and with it the living, vivid relations and swinging, vibrating space proper to a work of visual art." When an artist is able to achieve a balance of aesthetic form and what Hofmann called "vibrating space," any infusion of the artist's political beliefs would likely preclude that work from becoming a work of pure magic.

"Push and Pull"

Hofmann believed that modern artists should evoke pictorial space not in the traditional manner by modeling form with the use of atmospheric perspective, but by using contrasts of color, shape, and surface. Only in this way could an artist stay true to the fundamental fact of the canvas, its two-dimensionality. These tensions between form and color were crucial to a painting's success, Hofmann believed, and referred to them as the "push and pull" within a picture.

Although Hofmann's idea was grounded in aesthetics, the notion of "push-and-pull" may have originated with the early American modernist painter John Marin, who in 1913 wrote, "[New York is] made of powers [that] are at work pushing, pulling, sideways, downwards, upwards... I see great forces at work...the large buildings and the small buildings; the warring of the great and the small...feelings are aroused which give me the desire to express the reaction of these 'pull forces.'"

On the Fundamental Laws of Painting

Hans Hofmann Ideas

"Painting as a whole," wrote Hofmann in 1932, "possesses fundamentals. The highest law of painting is: The entity of the picture plane must be preserved. This entity is its essential two-dimensionality...this law connotes at once: the picture plane must achieve a three-dimensional effect (as distinguished from illusion) by means of the creative process." Hofmann cared little for any form of visual trickery or optical illusion in painting - he believed such devices defied the purity of the creative act on canvas. He believed that since a canvas was, by its nature, a flat surface, it should be treated as such. To apply anything to it other than paint was, in a sense, cheating the art form.

On Marx's Approach to Art

Hofmann formed several rules for painting, all of which were grounded in the Marxist belief that an artist is shaped and conditioned by historical circumstances and can only achieve as much as those circumstances will allow. As Marx argued, "Men make their own history, but they do not make it just as they please..." However, above all else, Hofmann believed that an artwork's meaning should be important to the creator. He also believed that historical and/or political content was an affront to the purity of art itself. And, regarding the necessity of speaking to one's historical moment, Hofmann once added his own caveat, late in life, while addressing some artists: "You belong to a certain time. You are yourself the result of time. You are the creator of this time."

On Women Artists

Despite working with and teaching many female artists throughout his life, including Lee Krasner and Helen Frankenthaler, Hofmann shared the prejudices of most members of the macho New York School. He doubted that women were the equals of men in achieving the same level of spirituality in art or in mastering his all-important method of "push and pull." Lee Krasner recalled a time when he had visited her studio and said, "this is so good you would not believe it was done by a woman."

Writing Style

Hofmann was both a romantic and an academic. He stressed the strictest of standards for creating art, yet believed that if an artist followed those standards with enough talent and determination, he could create an infinite number of possibilities. Heavily influenced by the philosophy and art theory of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (who also dabbled in optics), Hofmann explored such issues as color, depth, rhythm, perception, and form. Hofmann was also a firm believer in the place of nature in art, which might explain why many of his own paintings - abstract and non-objective as they are - were given titles that suggested natural imagery.



Original content written by Justin Wolf
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HANS HOFMANN QUOTES

"A teacher affects eternity; he can never tell where his influence stops."

"Art is to me the glorification of the human spirit, and as such it is the cultural documentation of the time in which it is produced."

"Painters must speak through paint, not through words."

"The whole world, as we experience it visually, comes to us through the mystic realm of color."

Hans Hofmann

Hans Hofmann Influences

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Pablo Picasso
Pablo Picasso
Picasso dominated European painting in the first half of the last century, and remains perhaps the century's most important, prolifically inventive, and versatile artist. Alongside Georges Braque, he pioneered Cubism. He also made significant contributions to Surrealist painting and media such as collage, welded sculpture, and ceramics.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Pablo Picasso
Henri Matisse
Henri Matisse
Henri Matisse was a French painter and sculptor who helped forge modern art. From his early Fauvist works to his late cutouts, he emphasized expansive fields of color, the expressive potential of gesture, and the sensuality inherent in art-making.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Henri Matisse
Georges Braque
Georges Braque
Georges Braque was a modern French painter who, along with Pablo Picasso, developed analytic Cubism and Cubist collage in the early twentieth century.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Georges Braque
Robert Delaunay
Robert Delaunay
Robert Delaunay was a French avant-garde painter. Early in his career he was associated with the Expressionist group The Blue Rider along with Kandinsky and Klee. Delaunay's singular style is referred to as Orphism; an approach that combines visual elements of Cubism, Expressionism and figurative abstraction.

Modern Art Information Robert Delaunay
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was a German writer during the late-eighteenth to early-nineteenth century. Originally a student of optics, Goethe was a major figure in German literature, humanism, philosophy, and a pioneer of German Romanticism. His best known work, the novella The Sorrows of Young Werther, was a key example of Sturm und Drang, a German literary movement that embraced subjectivity and intense emotion.

Modern Art Information Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Adolf von Hildebrand
Adolf von Hildebrand
Adolf von Hildebrand was a German sculptor during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. He traveled to Italy as a young student and became heavily influenced by the monumental works of Michelangelo and Florentine Renaissance sculpture. Hildebrand's best known works are his large-scale urban fountains, the most famous of which is in Munich.

Modern Art Information Adolf von Hildebrand
Peggy Guggenheim
Peggy Guggenheim
Peggy Guggenheim, the neice of Solomon R. Guggenheim, was a collector, patron, and eclectic personality deeply connected to modern art. She gave important exhibitions to many Surrealist and Abstract Expressionist artists at her Art of This Century gallery in New York in the 1940s.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Peggy Guggenheim
Surrealism
Surrealism
Perhaps the most influential avant-garde movement of the century, Surrealism was founded in Paris in 1924 by a small group of writers and artists who sought to channel the unconscious as a means to unlock the power of the imagination. Much influenced by Freud, they believed that the conscious mind repressed the power of the imagination. Influenced also by Marx, they hoped that the psyche had the power to reveal the contradictions in the everyday world and spur on revolution.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Surrealism
Fauvism
Fauvism
Fauvism was an early twentieth-century art movement founded by Henri Matisse and André Derain. Labeled as "wild beasts", Fauve artists favored vibrant colors and winding gestural strokes across the canvas.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Fauvism
Cubism
Cubism
Cubism was developed by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque between 1907-1911, and it continued to be highly influential long after its decline. This classic phase has two stages: 'Analytic', in which forms seem to be 'analyzed' and fragmented; and 'Synthetic', in which pre-existing materials such as newspaper and wood veneer are collaged to the surface of the canvas.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Cubism
Expressionism
Expressionism
Expressionism is a broad term for a host of movements in early twentieth-century Germany, from Die Brücke (1905) and Der Blaue Reiter (1911) to the early Neue Sachlichkeit painters in the 1920s and '30s. Many German Expressionists used vivid colors and abstracted forms to create spiritually or psychologically intense works, while others focused on depictions of war, alienation, and the modern city.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Expressionism
Lee Krasner
Lee Krasner
Lee Krasner was an American abstract painter and a prominent first-generation Abstract Expressionist. A student of Hans Hofmann's, and a pioneer in the all-over technique of painting that later influenced color-field artists such as Helen Frankenthaler, Morris Louis, and her husband, Jackson Pollock.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Lee Krasner
Frank Stella
Frank Stella
Frank Stella is an American artist whose geometric paintings and shaped canvases underscore the idea of the painting as object. A major influence on Minimalism, his iconic works include nested black and white stripes and concentric, angular half-circles in bright colors.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Frank Stella
Helen Frankenthaler
Helen Frankenthaler
Helen Frankenthaler was an American abstract painter in mid-twentieth-century New York. Along with Morris Louis and Kenneth Noland, Frankenthaler is considered a pioneer in the practice of color-field painting.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Helen Frankenthaler
Louise Nevelson
Louise Nevelson
Louise Nevelson was a Russian-born American artist who worked in the WPA and was a member of the Abstract Expressionist scene. She is best known for her black-painted constructions of assembled crates, boxes, headboards, and other wooden materials.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Louise Nevelson
Jackson Pollock
Jackson Pollock
Jackson Pollock was the most well-known Abstract Expressionist and the key example of Action Painting. His work ranges from Jungian scenes of primitive rites to the purely abstract "drip paintings" of his later career.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Jackson Pollock
Clement Greenberg
Clement Greenberg
Clement Greenberg was one the leading American art critics during the twentieth century. Best known as the ideological counterpart to Harold Rosenberg, Greenberg was a formalist who coined the terms "American-type painting" and 'Post-painterly abstraction.' He was a staunch champion of pure abstraction, including the work of Jackson Pollock, Clyfford Still and Hans Hofmann.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Clement Greenberg
Harold Rosenberg
Harold Rosenberg
Harold Rosenberg was a critic, art historian, and curator who published important works on modern art and culture. He was a leading exponent of Abstract Expressionism, and coined the term "Action Painting."
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Harold Rosenberg
Alfred H. Barr, Jr.
Alfred H. Barr, Jr.
Alfred H. Barr, Jr. was an American art historian, collector, and the first director of The Museum of Modern Art. Barr was very influential in MoMA's early years, arranging seminal exhibitions of works by Van Gogh, Léger, the Post-Impressionists and the Cubists.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Alfred H. Barr, Jr.
Gestural Abstraction
Gestural Abstraction
Gestural abstraction, or gesture painting, describes the mode of Abstract Expressionism that favored gestural strokes, drips, and contour lines over expansive fields of color. It was exemplified by such artists as Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Gestural Abstraction
Color Field Painting
Color Field Painting
A tendency within Abstract Expressionism, distinct from gestural abstraction, color field painting was developed by Barnett Newman, Mark Rothko, and Clyfford Still in the late 1940s, and developed further by Helen Frankenthaler and others. It is characterized by large fields of color and an absence of any figurative motifs, and often expresses a yearning for transcendence and the infinite.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Color Field Painting
Larry Rivers
Larry Rivers
Larry Rivers was an American artist whose work combines the brushy texture of Abstract Expressionism with figurative elements and a Pop art style. He was an earlier practitioner of appropriation techniques, and his paintings sample from art history, commercial products, celebrity imagery, and other styles and sources.

Modern Art Information Larry Rivers
Abstract Expressionism
Abstract Expressionism
A tendency among New York painters of the late 1940s and '50s, all of whom were committed to an expressive art of profound emotion and universal themes. The movement embraced the gestural abstraction of Willem de Kooning and Jackson Pollock, and the color field painting of Mark Rothko and others. It blended elements of Surrealism and abstract art in an effort to create a new style fitted to the postwar mood of anxiety and trauma.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Abstract Expressionism
Fernard Léger
Fernard Léger
Influenced by Cubism and Futurism, the French painter Fernand Léger developed a unique style of Cubism using cylindrical and other geometric forms with mechanically smooth edges. Often colorful and punctuated by patterns, his paintings range from still lifes and figures to abstract compositions.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Fernard Léger
Impressionism
Impressionism
A movement in painting that first surfaced in France in the 1860s, it sought new ways to describe effects of light and movement, often using rich colors. The Impressionists were drawn to modern life and often painted the city, but they also captured landscapes and scenes of middle-class leisure-taking in the suburbs.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Impressionism
Pointillism
Pointillism
Pointillism is a mode of art-making, first developed in 1880s France, in which all of the paint is applied to the surface as tiny points or daubs of color. Based on the laws of color theory, pointillism relies on the viewer's eye to mix the disparate dots into the lines, shapes, shadings, and color ranges of the full scene.

Modern Art Information Pointillism
Philip Guston
Philip Guston
Initially associated with the New York School of abstract art, Guston famously abandoned pure abstraction in the 1950s and turned to figurative art and quasi-abstract cartoon imagery. His later work, for which he is best known, was a major influence on the development of Neo-Expressionism in the U.S.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Philip Guston
Franz Kline
Franz Kline
Franz Kline was an American abstract painter and one of the pioneers of Abstract Expressionism. His signature black-and-white abstractions were inspired by Japanese calligraphy, and inspired a later generation of artists who created Minimalism.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Franz Kline
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Museum of Modern Art
Museum of Modern Art
The Museum has become the home for some of the greatest works of avant-garde painting, sculpture, film and multi-media art in the world. While MoMA remains true to its roots as a place where new styles of art can circulate, its permanent collection is widely considered the most impressive and diverse assortment of Modern art to ever exist, ranging from late-nineteenth-century van Goghs, Monets and Gauguins to works produced in the present day.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information Museum of Modern Art
The New York School and Abstract Expressionism
The New York School and Abstract Expressionism
The New York School is a reference to Abstract Expressionism movement, which was the tendency among New York painters of the late 1940s and 1950s, all of whom were committed to an expressive art of profound emotion and universal themes. The movement embraces the gestural abstraction of Willem de Kooning and Jackson Pollock, and the color field painting of Mark Rothko and others. It blended elements of Surrealism and abstract art in an effort to create a new style fitted to the post-war mood of anxiety and trauma.
TheArtStory - Modern Art GuideModern Art Information The New York School and Abstract Expressionism
John Marin
John Marin
John Marin was an early American modernist associated with the circle of artists around Alfred Stieglitz and the 1913 Armory Show. His paintings and watercolors often depicted abstracted cityscapes and landscapes.

Modern Art Information John Marin
The Wind
The Wind

Title: The Wind (c. 1944)

Artwork Description & Analysis: Pictures such as The Wind have been at the center of a long controversy over whether Hofmann inspired Jackson Pollock's use of the drip technique. Some have claimed that Pollock saw pictures like this when he visited Hofmann's studio in 1942, and that this inspired his first use of poured paint in 1943.It was first thought that this work was produced in 1942, but now, professionals believe, that The Wind was produced around 1944, and that it was Pollock and Hofmann's twin interest in the work of André Masson, among others, that led both men to experiment with dripped paint at the same time.


Oil, duco, gouache and India ink on poster board - Collection University of California, Berkeley Art Museum

Self-Portrait with Brushes
Self-Portrait with Brushes

Title: Self-Portrait with Brushes (1942)

Artwork Description & Analysis: Hofmann created many self-portrait drawings and paintings, usually depicting himself at work. Self-Portrait with Brushes is typical of his approach, yet it stands out in the way it combines styles to create an expressive character sketch. Using bold outlines to exaggerate his own features - creating a broad triangular nose and tousled hair - Hofmann projects a playful persona in a blue on yellow palette set within the interior space of his studio.


Casein on plywood - Andre Emmerich Gallery, New York

Ecstasy
Ecstasy

Title: Ecstasy (1947)

Artwork Description & Analysis: In 1947, Hofmann abandoned painting on board and began to use canvas. He also began to explore a wider variety of styles, and Ecstasy reflects his experiments, showing his continued loyalty to European masters such as Joan Miro and Hans Arp at a time when many of Hofmann's American colleagues were trying to overcome European influences.


Oil on canvas - University of California, Berkeley Art Museum

The Conjurer
The Conjurer

Title: The Conjurer (1959)

Artwork Description & Analysis: Moving from geometric into fluid forms and a more intense color range, The Conjurer demonstrates the diversity of Hofmann's mature style. He uses density of color and constellations of shapes to evoke psychological and spatial relationships, rather than objective reality.


Oil on canvas - Collection of Stadtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus, Munich

The Garden
The Garden

Title: The Garden (1956)

Artwork Description & Analysis: Revisiting one of his earliest inspirations, Pointillism, Hofmann here uses thick dabs of paint to create the mosaic of polychromatic textures that structures the composition. The flowers depicted were those grown by his first wife, Miz, and the sumptuous blooms that emerge and recede in the picture create a dynamism that makes the color swirl.


Oil on Plywood - University of California, Berkeley Art Museum

To Miz - Pax Vobiscum
To Miz - Pax Vobiscum

Title: To Miz - Pax Vobiscum (1964)

Artwork Description & Analysis: Hofmann's first wife, Miz, was a constant support and companion to him for almost 60 years, and after her death he painted this vibrant canvas as a memorial. He used the relationship of bright colors to create shapes expressing his feelings of loss.


Oil on canvas - Collection Modern Art Museum of Forth Worth, Museum purchase

Eiffel Tower with Trees
Eiffel Tower with Trees

Title: Eiffel Tower with Trees (1910)

Artist: Robert Delaunay

Artwork Description & Analysis: While living in Paris between 1904 and 1914, Hofmann received much of his education in art and theory from frequent encounters with Picasso, Matisse and Braque, and particularly from a close friendship with Robert Delaunay. Delaunay's work, such as his Eiffel Tower with Trees (which was part of a series devoted to the monument), showed Hofmann how he might balance color and form; it even encouraged him to paint his own quasi-Cubist still lifes.


Oil on canvas - The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

The Conversation
The Conversation

Title: The Conversation (1908-12)

Artist: Henri Matisse

Artwork Description & Analysis: Hofmann admired few artists more than Matisse. Above all, he was in awe of the Frenchman's discipline and virtue, his unequivocal devotion to harmony in art. While Hofmann's own painterly style and application differed greatly from Matisse's, he considered the Frenchman's use of color to be exemplary and often cited his technique when instructing his own students.


Oil on canvas - State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia

Male and Female
Male and Female

Title: Male and Female (1942)

Artist: Jackson Pollock

Artwork Description & Analysis: Lee Krasner, after meeting her husband-to-be, Jackson Pollock, convinced her long-time teacher Hans Hofmann to visit Pollock's studio, guaranteeing he would like what he saw. Upon his first visit, in 1942, Hofmann was impressed - albeit somewhat concerned with Pollock's casual attitude toward painting. Hofmann recalled being concerned over cans full of dried paint scattered around the studio, and Pollock's apparent disdain for most art. Yet Pollock was intimidated by Hofmann's knowledge of European art, and many still believe that Pollock's signature "drip" method originated from his encounters with the older man.


Oil on canvas - Philadelphia Museum of Art

Bibliography
The books and articles below constitute a bibliography of the sources used in the writing this page. These also suggests some accessible resources for further research, especially ones that can be found and purchased via the internet.